nord

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See also: Nord, nord-, nörd, and nørd

Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

nord m (uncountable)

  1. north

See also[edit]

Cardinal directions (punt cardinal):

NO N NE
O Compass rose simple plain.svg E
SO S SE
n-occ sept n-or
occ Compass rose simple plain.svg or
s-occ mer s-or

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse norðr, from Proto-Germanic *nurþrą.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /noːr/, [noɐ̯ˀ]

Noun[edit]

nord c (singular definite norden, not used in plural form)

  1. The north.

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

nord

  1. Toward the north, northwards.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French, from Old French norht, north, nort (north), from Old English norþ (north), from Proto-Germanic *nurþrą (north), from Proto-Indo-European *ner- (lower, bottom; to sink, shrivel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nord m (plural nord)

  1. north

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Guernésiais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French norht, north, nort (north), from Old English norþ (north), from Proto-Germanic *nurþrą (north), from Proto-Indo-European *ner- (lower, bottom; to sink, shrivel).

Noun[edit]

nord m (invariable)

  1. north

Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

nord (uncountable)

  1. north

Adjective[edit]

nord (not comparable)

  1. north

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Via Spanish and French, ultimately from Old English norþ, from Proto-Germanic *nurþrą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nord m (invariable)

  1. north

Antonyms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

nord m, f (invariable)

  1. northern

See also[edit]


Jèrriais[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French norht, north, nort (north), from Old English norþ.

Noun[edit]

nord m (usually uncountable)

  1. north

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French norht, north, nort (north), from Old English norþ.

Noun[edit]

nord m (usually uncountable)

  1. north

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse norðr, from Proto-Germanic *nurþrą.

Noun[edit]

nord

  1. north, a compass direction
  2. Indefinite form singular of Norden = the Nordic countries
  3. (dialectal, obsolete) upriver (in the mountain valleys of eastern Norway, without considering the actual orientation of the valley)

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *nurþrą, akin to Old English norþ, Old Norse norðr.

Noun[edit]

nord ?

  1. north

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French nord, from Middle French, from Old French norht, north, nort (north), from Old English norþ (north), from Proto-Germanic *nurþrą (north), from Proto-Indo-European *ner- (lower, bottom; to sink, shrivel).

Noun[edit]

nord n (uncountable)

  1. north

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French nord, from Old French norht, north, nort (north), from Old English norþ (north), from Proto-Germanic *nurþrą (north), from Proto-Indo-European *ner- (lower, bottom; to sink, shrivel).

Noun[edit]

nord m

  1. north

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nord c

  1. north, a compass direction
  2. Indefinite form singular of Norden = the Nordic countries

Related terms[edit]