ond

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See also: ónd and önd

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vándr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ond (neuter ondt, definite and plural onde, comparative ondere or værre, superlative ondest or værst)

  1. evil

Antonyms[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ǫnd.

Noun[edit]

ond f (genitive singular andar, plural andir)

  1. breath
  2. soul

Declension[edit]

f4 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ond ondin andir andirnar
Accusative ond ondina andir andirnar
Dative ond ondini ondum ondunum
Genitive andar andarinnar anda andanna



Norwegian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ond

  1. bad (evil, wicked)


This Norwegian entry was created from the translations listed at bad. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see ond in the Norwegian Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) August 2009


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Variant of and.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ond

  1. and

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse vándr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ond

  1. evil
  2. angry (dated)
    nej, jag är inte ond på dig
    no, I’m not angry with you.
  3. hurting, making pain
    jag har en ond
    I have a hurt toe

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • The more common use is min tå gör ont (my toe hurts) or jag har ont i tån (I have pain in the toe)

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Conjunction[edit]

ond

  1. but