oose

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See also: OOSE

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From plural form of Scots oo (wool).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

oose (uncountable)

  1. (Scotland) Fluff.
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, p. 100:
      But when I came out it was all fluff and oose stuff down my pyjamas.

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

oose

  1. (US) yucca
    • 1860, Recollections of a Handcart Pioneer of 1860: A Woman's Life on the Mormon Frontier, Mary Ann Hafen, Donna Toland Smart, U of Nebraska Press, May 1, 2004
      A favorite substitute for soap was the root of the "oose," or yucca, sometimes called "soap root." This root looked about like a sugarbeet. Cut up and left in water it soon made a fluffy suds. Colored clothes came out fresh and bright because the cleanser did not harm the dyes. White clothes however were turned slightly yellow by it and therefore were not generally washes with oose. I remember how soft, fluffy, and sweet-smelling my hair walways felt after a shampoo with oose suds. For mopping the wooden floors the oose root served not only as soap but as scrubbing crush as well. And how white and beautiful those floors would look.
    • 1936-1941, Nancy Cedenia Bagley Willis (in interview with Roberta Flake Clayton as part of the Federal Writers Project; included in In Our Own Words: The Lives of Arizona Pioneer Women, edited by Barbara Marriott, Fireship Press, 2009)
      When I was older I went out on the hillsides and dug the roots of oose, or Amole as the Mexicans call it, which were excellent to use in place of soap.
    • 1942, The Giant Joshua by Maurine Whipple
      She climbed the Red Hill one cold day and dug oose root with which to bring a new luster to her long black hair.

Scots[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

oose

  1. Alternative form of oos
  2. fluff