orthosexuality

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

ortho- +‎ sexuality.

Noun[edit]

orthosexuality (uncountable)

  1. (rare) The orthodox or socially accepted form of sexuality or sexual expression in a particular culture.
    • 1996, William Haver, The Body of This Death: Historicity and Sociality in the Time of AIDS, Stanford University Press (1996), ISBN 9780804727167, pages 2-3:
      We have erected, perhaps in place of other erections, entire structures of intelligibility and comprehensibility on and around the pandemic, structures that themselves render AIDS normative and routine: the business of AIDS, constructed and carried on around an impossible object, has become—like genocide, nuclear terror, racism, misogyny, and heteronormativity (or what I would prefer to call orthosexuality)—business as usual.
    • 1998, J. Anthony Samenfink, "It's Time To Take A 'Correct' Approach To Sex Education", Chicago Tribune, 5 April 1998:
      To prevent these unintended pregnancies, it is time to take a new approach to sex education -- orthosexuality. Ortho is from the Greek meaning proper or correct, thus orthosexuality is a method of sex education that focuses on correctly channeling the sexual drive while emphasizing the importance of preventing pregnancy, AIDS and other sexual diseases.
    • 2005, Barbara Molony & Kathleen S. Uno, Gendering Modern Japanese History, Harvard University Asia Center (2005), ISBN 9780674017801, page 193:
      [] from ads in naichi (metropolitan) magazines and newspapers published inside Japan[,] in that the regulative ideal of orthosexuality was not assumed to be reproductive, monogamous marriage. In Dalian, as everywhere in the Japanese colonies, a healthy sex life for men free from what the ad calls the "bad habit of masturbation" (akushu onani) and "debilitating sexual neurasthenia" (seiteki shinkei suijaku) would begin for most Japanese men by hygienically following the advice in the colonial newspaper's weekly column called "Using the Red-Light District" (karyūshi).

Related terms[edit]