os

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Contents

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From neuter Latin word os (bone) (genitive: ossis).

Noun[edit]

os (plural ossa)

  1. (rare, medicine) Bone.
Usage notes[edit]

Only used by doctors and surgeons when practising. Not used by medical laypeople.

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From neuter Latin word os (mouth) (genitive: oris).

Noun[edit]

os (plural ora)

  1. (rare) A mouth; an opening.
  2. In particular, either end of the cervix, internal (to the uterus) or external (to the vagina).
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Swedish.

Noun[edit]

os

  1. An osar or esker.

Etymology 4[edit]

o +‎ -s.

Noun[edit]

os

  1. plural form of o
Usage notes[edit]
  • There is some difference of opinion regarding the use of apostrophes in the pluralization of references to letters as symbols. New Fowler's Modern English Usage, after noting that the usage has changed, states at page 602 that "after letters an apostrophe is obligatory." The 15th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style states at paragraph 7.16, "To avoid confusion, lowercase letters ... form the plural with an apostrophe and an s". The Oxford Style Manual at page 116 advocates the use of common sense.

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin illos.

Article[edit]

os m pl

  1. the
    Os lugars d'Aragón
    The villages of Aragon

Usage notes[edit]

  • The form los, either pronounced as los or as ros, can be found after words ending with an -o.
  • Some dialects use the form els, often shortened to es.

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ossum, from os. Compare Daco-Romanian os.

Noun[edit]

os

  1. bone

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ossum, from os.

Noun[edit]

os m (plural ossos)

  1. bone

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse oss (us).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

os

  1. us, objective case of vi
  2. (reflexive) ourselves
  3. (pluralis majestatis) ourself
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Disputed.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

os c (singular definite osen, not used in plural form)

  1. smoke
  2. reek
  3. fug

Verb[edit]

os

  1. Imperative of ose.

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *osso, earlier *ohso, from Proto-Germanic *uhsô.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

os m (plural ossen, diminutive osje n)

  1. ox (a castrated bull)

Derived terms[edit]


Fala[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese os, from Latin illos.

Article[edit]

os m pl (singular o, feminine a, feminine plural as)

  1. masculine plural of o (the)
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Chapter 1: Lengua Española:
      En esti territorio se han assentau, en os anus que se indican, os habitantis siguientis:
      In this territory there were living, in the years specified, the following (amount of) inhabitants:

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ossum, popular variant of os, ossis, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ost- (bone).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

os m (plural os)

  1. bone

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old Portuguese os, from Latin illōs, accusative plural of ille (that).

Article[edit]

os m pl (masculine singular o, feminine singular a, feminine plural as)

  1. (definite) the

Usage notes[edit]

The definite article o (in all its forms) regularly forms contractions when it follows the prepositions a (to), con (with), de (of, from), and en (in). For example, con os ("with the") contracts to cos, and en os ("in the") contracts to nos.

Derived terms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

os m pl accusative (nominative eles, oblique eles, dative lles)

  1. them (masculine plural third-person personal pronoun)

Usage notes[edit]

The third-person direct object pronouns o, os, a, and as, have variant forms prefixed with l- or n-. These alternative forms appear depending on the ending of the preceding word. The l- forms (e.g. los) are used when the preceding word ends in -r or -s. The n- forms (e.g. nos) are used when the preceding word ends in a -u or a diphthong. These alternative forms are then suffixed to the preceding word.

In all other situations, the standard forms of the pronouns are used (o, os, a, as) and are not suffixed to the preceding word.

These direct object pronouns also form contractions when they immediately follow an indirect object pronoun. For example, Dou che os ("I gave you them.") contracts to Dou chos.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

os m (genitive ois, nominative plural ois)

  1. (literary) deer

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

os

  1. over

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
os n-os hos t-os
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Istro-Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ossum, from os.

Noun[edit]

os n (plural ose, definite singular osu, definite plural osele)

  1. bone

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

ōs (mouth)

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁éh₃(o)s (mouth). Cognates include Hittite 𒀀𒄿𒅖 (aiš, mouth), Sanskrit आस् (ās, mouth), Old Church Slavonic оуста (usta, mouth) and Old Irish á (mouth).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ōs n (genitive ōris); third declension

  1. mouth
    • 405, Jerome and others, Vulgate, Genesis 8:11
      at illa venit ad eum ad vesperam portans ramum olivae virentibus foliis in ore suo intellexit ergo Noe quod cessassent aquae super terram
      But it came to him in the evening carrying a green-leaved olive branch in its mouth, therefore Noah understood that the waters above the land were coming to and end.
  2. face, appearance, head
  3. (poetic) speech
  4. opening, entrance
  5. accusative singular of ōs
  6. vocative singular of ōs
Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative ōs ōra
genitive ōris ōrum
dative ōrī ōribus
accusative ōs ōra
ablative ōre ōribus
vocative ōs ōra
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

ossa manūs (bones of the hand)

From Proto-Indo-European *h₃ésth₁ (bone). Cognates include Ancient Greek ὀστέον (ostéon), Sanskrit अस्थि (asthi) and Old Armenian ոսկր (oskr).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

os n (genitive ossis); third declension

  1. bone
  2. heartwood
  3. the hard or innermost part of trees or fruits
  4. framework of discourse
  5. accusative singular of os
Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter i-stem.

Number Singular Plural
nominative os ossa
genitive ossis ossium
ossum
dative ossī ossibus
accusative os ossa
ablative osse ossibus
vocative os ossa
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

os m (plural os)

  1. bone

Descendants[edit]

  • French: os

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ansuz (god, deity), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ens- (engender, beget). Cognate with Old Norse áss.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ōs m (nominative plural ēse) (declension unknown)

  1. god
  2. the runic character (/o/ or /oː/)

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ossum, from os.

Noun[edit]

os m (oblique plural os, nominative singular os, nominative plural os)

  1. bone

Old Saxon[edit]

Noun[edit]

os m

  1. Alternative form of as

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

os f

  1. genitive plural of osa

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese os, Latin illōs (with the disappearance of an initial l; compare Spanish los).

Article[edit]

os m pl

  1. Masculine plural of article o.
    • 2007, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e as Relíquias da Morte (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows), Rocco, page 546:
      Está na hora de testarmos os nossos talentos no mundo real, você não acha?
      It's time to test the talents of ours in the real world, don't you think?
    • 2007, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e as Relíquias da Morte (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows), Rocco, page 308:
      Você notou os cabelos dela, são negros e brilhantes e macios...
      You noticed her hair (“her hairs”), it's dark and brilliant and soft...
    • 2007, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e as Relíquias da Morte (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows), Rocco, page 373:
      Devíamos fechar os olhos dele.
      We should close his eyes (“the eyes of him”).

See also[edit]

Portuguese articles (edit)
Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine Masculine Feminine
Definite articles
(the)
o a os as
Indefinite articles
(a, an; some)
um uma uns umas

Pronoun[edit]

os

  1. (object pronoun) 3rd person them (as a direct object; as an indirect object, see lhes; after prepositions, see eles).
    Encontrei-os na rua.
    I met them at the street.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Becomes -los after verb forms ending in -r, -s, or -z, the pronouns nos and vos, and the adverb eis; the ending letter causing the change disappears.
    After ver: Posso vê-los? = "May I see them?"
    After pôs: Pô-los ali. = "He put them there."
    After fiz: Fi-los ficarem contentes. = "I made them become happy."
    After nos: Deu-no-los relutantemente. = "He gave them to us reluctantly."
    After eis: Ei-los! = "Behold them!"
  • Becomes -nos after a nasal diphthong: -ão, -am [ɐ̃w̃], -õe [õj̃], -em, -êm [ẽj̃].
    Detêm-nos como prisioneiros. = "They detain them as a prisoners."
  • In Brasil it is being abandoned in favor of the nominative form eles.
    Eu os vi.Eu vi eles.: “I saw them.”

See also[edit]

Portuguese personal pronouns (edit)
Number Person Nominative
(subject)
Objective
(direct object)
Objective
(indirect object)
Prepositional Prepositional
with com
Non-declining
m f m f m and f m f m f m f
Singular First eu me mim comigo
Second tu te ti contigo você
o senhor a senhora
Third ele ela o
(lo, no)
a
(la, na)
lhe ele ela com ele com ela o mesmo a mesma
se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)
Plural First nós nos nós connosco (Portugal)
conosco (Brazil)
a gente
Second vós vos vós convosco vocês
os senhores as senhoras
Third eles elas os
(los, nos)
as
(las, nas)
lhes eles elas com eles com elas os mesmos as mesmas
se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)
Indefinite se (reflexive) si (reflexive) consigo (reflexive)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ossum, popular variant of os, ossis, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ost- (bone). Compare Catalan os, French os, Italian osso, Portuguese osso, Sardinian ossu, Spanish hueso.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

os n (plural oase)

  1. (anatomy) bone

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Preposition[edit]

os

  1. (obsolete) over, above

Usage notes[edit]

  • Now used only in the compounds listed below.

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *osь

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ȏs f (Cyrillic spelling о̑с)

  1. axis

Declension[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *osь.

Noun[edit]

os f (genitive singular kosť, nominative plural osi)

  1. axis (geometry: imaginary line)
  2. axle

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *osь.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ós f (genitive osí, nominative plural osí)

  1. axis (geometry: imaginary line)

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vos.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /os/
  • Homophone: hoz (non-Castilian)

Pronoun[edit]

os

  1. you, to you, for you; dative and accusative of vosotros.

See also[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

os n

  1. (uncountable) (bad) smell, especially a strong smell originating from cooking
  2. a river mouth; the place where a creek, stream or river enters into a lake
  3. indefinite genitive singular of o

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

os

  1. (impersonal pronoun) it

Welsh[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

os

  1. if
    Os ydw i'n iawn, felly rwyt ti'n mewn trafferth.- If I am right, then you are in trouble.