paco

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See also: pacò

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

paco (plural pacos or pacoes)

  1. (archaic) alpaca
  2. An earthy-looking ore, consisting of brown oxide of iron with minute particles of native silver.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ure to this entry?)
    • 1880, John Percy, Metallurgy: the art of extracting metals from their ores (page 652)
      Mr. Ratcliffe has sometimes found them to contain arsenic in an oxidized state, combined with ferric oxide, and once he met with a paco ore mainly composed of antimony ochre.

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pāx (peace).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

paco (plural pacoj, accusative singular pacon, accusative plural pacojn)

  1. peace
    Post tri longaj jaroj la popolo soporis pacon.
    After three long years, the people yearned for peace.
    La deziro al paco sidas en ĉiu homa koro.
    The desire for peace resides in each human heart.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

paco

  1. first-person singular present indicative of pacare

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From pāx (peace).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

present active pācō, present infinitive pācāre, perfect active pācāvī, supine pācātum

  1. I make peaceful, pacify, quiet, soothe; subdue.

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • paco in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

paco m (plural pacos, feminine paca)

  1. (chiefly Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay) male paca
  2. (colloquial, pejorative, Latin America) police officer
  3. (colloquial, Obsolete, Spain) During Spanish occupation in Africa, a Moroccan sniper
  4. (given name, Spain) Short for Francisco