pall

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See also: Páll

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Old English pæll, from Latin pallium (cloak, covering).

Noun[edit]

pall (plural palls)

  1. (archaic) Fine cloth, especially purple cloth used for robes.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wyclif Bible (Esther viii. 15) to this entry?)
  2. (Christianity) A cloth used for various purposes on the altar in a church.
  3. (Christianity) A piece of cardboard, covered with linen and embroidered on one side, used to cover the chalice.
  4. (Christianity) A pallium (woollen vestment in Roman Catholicism).
    • Fuller
      About this time Pope Gregory sent two archbishop's palls into England, — the one for London, the other for York.
  5. (heraldry) A figure resembling the Roman Catholic pallium, or pall, and having the form of the letter Y.
  6. A heavy canvas, especially one laid over a coffin or tomb.
    • 1942, Rebecca West, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, Canongate (2006), page 150:
      Thirty years or so later, a woman was put to death for stealing the purple pall from his sarcophagus, a strange, crazy crime, []
  7. An outer garment; a cloak or mantle.
    • Shakespeare
      His lion's skin changed to a pall of gold.
  8. (obsolete) nausea
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shaftesbury to this entry?)
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

pall (third-person singular simple present palls, present participle palling, simple past and past participle palled)

  1. To cloak.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Etymology 2[edit]

Aphetism from appall.

Verb[edit]

pall (third-person singular simple present palls, present participle palling, simple past and past participle palled)

  1. (transitive) To make vapid or insipid; to make lifeless or spiritless; to dull; to weaken.
    • Atterbury
      Reason and reflection [] pall all his enjoyments.
  2. (intransitive) To become vapid, tasteless, dull, or insipid; to lose strength, life, spirit, or taste.
    The liquor palls.
    • Addison
      Beauty soon grows familiar to the lover, / Fades in the eye, and palls upon the sense.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter VI
      We are all becoming accustomed to adventure. It is beginning to pall on us. We suffered no casualties and there was no illness.

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *palei-, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pel- 'to speak with a loud voice'. Cognate to Gothic spillon (spillon, to proclaim)[1].

Verb[edit]

pall (first-person singular past tense palla, participle pallë/pallur)

  1. To cry, hee-haw.
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997, p.365

Estonian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pall (genitive palli, partitive palli)

  1. (sports) ball

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Swedish[edit]

pall[4] = pawl (2)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pall c

  1. a stool; a chair without armrests or a back
  2. (sports) a podium for prize ceremonies
  3. a pallet; a movable platform, constructed to be moved by forklifts
  4. a pawl (a pin in a ratchet gear)
    att stå pall
    to cope, to stand against pressure
  5. (dated, slang) an apple

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Noun[edit]

pall m (plural pallon)

  1. tent

Synonyms[edit]