panacea

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See also: Panacea

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin panacēa, from Ancient Greek πανάκεια (panákeia), from πανακής (panakḗs, all-healing), from πᾶν (pân, all) (equivalent to English pan-) + ἄκος (ákos, cure).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

panacea (plural panaceas or panaceæ)

  1. A remedy believed to cure all disease and prolong life that was originally sought by alchemists; a cure-all.
  2. Something that will solve all problems.
    A monorail will be a panacea for our traffic woes.
  3. (obsolete) A particular plant believed to provide a cure-all.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.v:
      There, whether it diuine Tobacco were, / Or Panachæa, or Polygony, / She found, and brought it to her patient deare [...].

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin panacēa, from Ancient Greek πανάκεια (panákeia), from πανακής (panakḗs, all-healing), from πᾶν (pân, all) + ἄκος (ákos, cure).

Noun[edit]

panacea f (plural panacee)

  1. panacea, cure-all

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek πανάκεια (panákeia), from πανακής (panakḗs, all-healing), from πᾶν (pân, all) + ἄκος (ákos, cure).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

panacēa f (genitive panacēae); first declension

  1. A particular kind of plant, believed to cure all diseases.
  2. panacea, catholicon.

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative panacēa panacēae
genitive panacēae panacēārum
dative panacēae panacēīs
accusative panacēam panacēās
ablative panacēā panacēīs
vocative panacēa panacēae

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin panacēa, Ancient Greek πανάκεια (panákeia), from πανακής (panakḗs, all-healing), from πᾶν (pân, all) + ἄκος (ákos, cure).

Noun[edit]

panacea f (plural panaceas)

  1. panacea