pash

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Contraction of passion.

Verb[edit]

pash (third-person singular simple present pashes, present participle pashing, simple past and past participle pashed)

  1. (dialect) To throw (or be thrown) and break.
  2. (Australia, New Zealand, slang) To snog, to make out, to kiss.
    • 2003, Frances Whiting, Oh to Be a Marching Girl, page 18,
      Anyway, the point is, my first pash — or snog, or whatever you want to call it — was so bloody awful it′s a miracle I ever opened my mouth again.
    • 2003, Andrew Daddo, You′re Dropped!, ISBN 9780733616129, unnumbered page,
      ‘You gonna pash her?’
      ‘We only just started going together,’ I said. Pash her? Already? I hadn′t even kissed a girl properly yet.
      ‘Do you know how to pash?’ It sounded like a challenge. Jed Wall was a bit like that. When he wasn′t just hanging he was fighting or pashing or something that no one else was good at.
    • 2005, Gabrielle Morrissey, Urge: Hot Secrets For Great Sex, HarperCollins Publishers (Australia), unnumbered page,
      There are hundreds of different types of kisses; and there are kissing Kamasutras available in bookshops to help you add variety to your pashing repertoire.

Noun[edit]

pash (plural pashes)

  1. A passionate kiss.
  2. A romantic infatuation; a crush.
    • 1988, Catherine Cookson, Bill Bailey′s Daughter, in 1997, Bill Bailey: An Omnibus, page 166,
      ‘It isn′t a pash. Nancy Burke′s got a pash on Mr Richards and Mary Parkin has a pash on Miss Taylor, and so have other girls. But I haven′t got a pash on Rupert. It isn′t like that. I know it isn′t. I know it isn′t.’
    • 2002, Thelma Ruck Keene, The Handkerchief Drawer: An Autobiography in Three Parts, page 92,
      Not until the outcome of Denise′s pash did I admit that my pash on Joan had been very different.
    • 2010, Gwyneth Daniel, A Suitable Distance, page 82,
      At school it was called a pash. Having a pash on big handsome Robin, who used to cycle up to the village in his holidays from boarding school, and smile at her. She still had a pash on Robin. He still smiled at her.
  3. The object of a romantic infatuation; a crush.
  4. Any obsession or passion.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Scots word for the pate, or head.

Noun[edit]

pash (plural pashes)

  1. (UK, dialect, obsolete) A crushing blow.
  2. (UK, dialect, obsolete) A heavy fall of rain or snow.
  3. (obsolete) The head.

Etymology 3[edit]

Probably of imitative origin, or possibly akin to box (to fight with the fists).

Verb[edit]

pash (third-person singular simple present pashes, present participle pashing, simple past and past participle pashed)

  1. To strike; to crush; to smash; to dash into pieces.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Piers Plowman to this entry?)
    • Shakespeare
      I'll pash him o'er the face.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Anagrams[edit]