patriot

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See also: Patriot

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Middle French compatriot around 1600, from Late Latin patriōta (fellow countryman) from the Ancient Greek πατριώτης (patriotēs, of the same country), from πατρίς (patris, father land", "country), from πατήρ (pater, father).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpæt.ɹi.ət/, /ˈpeɪ.tɹi.ət/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈpeɪ.t(ʃ)ɹi.ət/

Noun[edit]

patriot (plural patriots)

  1. A person who loves and zealously supports and defends their country.
    • Alexander Pope
      Such tears as patriots shed for dying laws.
    • 1901, G. K. Chesterton, The Defendant, page 166:
      “My country, right or wrong”, is a thing that no patriot would think of saying except in a desperate case. It is like saying, “My mother, drunk or sober”.
    • 1953, Sydney J. Harris, “Purely Personal Prejudices”, in Strictly Personal[1], Regnery, page 228:
      The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
    • 2013, Simon Jenkins, Gibraltar and the Falklands deny the logic of history (in The Guardian, 14 August 2013)[2]
      Nothing beats a gunboat. HMS Illustrious glided out of Portsmouth on Monday, past HMS Victory and cheering crowds of patriots. Within a week it will be off Gibraltar, a mere cannon shot from Cape Trafalgar.
  2. (archaic) A fellow countryman, a compatriot.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of J. S. Mill's On Liberty to this entry?)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

patriot m (plural patriotten, diminutive patriotje n)

  1. patriot

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

patrìot m (Cyrillic spelling патрѝот)

  1. patriot

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]