pet

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See also: pět, Pet., and PET

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Attested since the 1500s in the sense "indulged child" and since the 1530s in the sense "animal companion".[1][2][3] From Scots and dialectal Northern English, of unclear origin. Perhaps a back-formation of petty, pety (little, small), a term formerly used to describe children and animals (e.g. pet lambs).[2][3] Alternatively, perhaps a borrowing of Scottish Gaelic peata, from Old Irish petta, peta (pet, lap-dog), of uncertain (possibly pre-Proto-Indo-European) origin.[4] Compare peat (pet, darling, woman).

The verb is derived from the noun.[2][3]

Noun[edit]

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Wikipedia

pet (plural pets)

  1. An animal kept as a companion.
  2. One who is excessively loyal to a superior.
  3. Any person or animal especially cherished and indulged; a darling.
    • Tatler
      the love of cronies, pets, and favourites
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ pet” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 pet” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 pet” in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Online
  4. ^ 2000, Peter Schrijver, “Non-Indo-European Surviving in Ireland in the First Millennium AD”, Ériu, volume 51, pages 195–199: 

Verb[edit]

pet (third-person singular simple present pets, present participle petting, simple past and past participle petted)

  1. (transitive) To stroke or fondle (an animal).
  2. (transitive, informal) To stroke or fondle (another person) amorously.
  3. (intransitive, informal) Of two or more people, to stroke and fondle one another amorously.
  4. (dated, transitive) To treat as a pet; to fondle; to indulge.
    His daughter was petted and spoiled.
  5. (archaic, intransitive) To be a pet.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Feltham to this entry?)
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pet (not comparable)

  1. Favourite; cherished.
    a pet child
    a pet theory
    • F. Harrison
      Some young lady's pet curate.

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of petulance.

Noun[edit]

pet (plural pets)

  1. A fit of petulance, a sulk, arising from the impression that one has been offended or slighted.
    • 1891, Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger People's" Country, Nebraska 2005, p. 105:
      There was something ludicrous, even more, unbecoming a gentleman, in leaving a friend's house in a pet, with the host's reproaches sounding in his ears, to be matched only by the bitterness of the guest's sneering retorts.

Etymology 3[edit]

Clipping of petition.

Noun[edit]

pet (plural pets)

  1. Abbreviation of petition.

Etymology 4[edit]

Clipping of petal.

Noun[edit]

pet (plural pets)

  1. (Geordie) A term of endearment usually applied to women and children.

References[edit]

  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin peditum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pet m (plural pets)

  1. (colloquial) fart

Related terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pet m (plural petten, diminutive petje n)

  1. cap (headwear with a peak at the front)

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin peditum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pet m (plural pets)

  1. (colloquial) fart

External links[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pectus.

Noun[edit]

pet m (plural pets)

  1. (anatomy) chest

See also[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

pet

  1. rafsi of petso.

Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

pet m (plural pets)

  1. (vulgar) fart, gas, flatulence

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran) pèz
  • (Sutsilvan) péz

Etymology[edit]

From Latin pectus.

Noun[edit]

pet m (plural pets)

  1. (Puter, Vallader, anatomy) chest, thorax

Related terms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun) sain
  • (Sursilvan) sein
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) sagn

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *pętь, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

pȇt (Cyrillic spelling пе̑т)

  1. (cardinal) five (5)

Slovene[edit]

Slovene numbers
< 4 6 >

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *pętь, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

pét

  1. five

Declension[edit]