pop

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See also: Pop and POP

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia en

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Onomatopoeic – used to describe the sound, or short, sharp actions.

Noun[edit]

pop (countable and uncountable, plural pops)

  1. (countable) A loud, sharp sound as of a cork coming out of a bottle.
    Listen to the pop of a champagne cork.
  2. (uncountable, colloquial) An effervescent or fizzy drink, most frequently nonalcoholic; soda pop.
    • 1941, LIFE magazine, 8 September 1941, page 27
      The best thing on the table was a tray full of bottles of lemon pop.
  3. (countable, colloquial) A bottle, can, or serving of effervescent or fizzy drink, most frequently nonalcoholic; soda pop.
    Go in the store and buy us three pops.
  4. Shortened from pop shot: a quick, possibly unaimed, shot with a firearm. Possibly confusion, by assonance, with pot as in pot shot.
    The man with the gun took a pop at the rabbit.
  5. (colloquial) A portion, a quantity dispensed.
    They cost 50 pence a pop.
  6. (computing) The removal of a data item from the top of a stack.
    • 2011, Mark Lutz, Programming Python (page 1371)
      Pushes and pops change the stack; indexing just accesses it.
  7. A bird, the European redwing.
  8. (physics) The sixth derivative of the position vector with respect to time (after velocity, acceleration, jerk, jounce, crackle), i.e. the rate of change of crackle.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

pop (third-person singular simple present pops, present participle popping, simple past and past participle popped)

  1. (ergative) To burst (something): to cause to burst.
    The boy with the pin popped the balloon.
    • 1922, Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room, chapter 1:
      The waves came round her. She was a rock. She was covered with the seaweed which pops when it is pressed. He was lost.
    • 2011 December 14, Steven Morris, “Devon woman jailed for 168 days for killing kitten in microwave”, Guardian:
      The court was told Robins had asked if she could use the oven to heat some baby food for her child. Knutton heard a loud popping noise "like a crisp packet being popped" coming from the kitchen followed by a "screeching" noise. When she saw what had happened to the kitten she was sick in the sink.
  2. To act suddenly, unexpectedly or quickly.
  3. To hit.
    He popped me on the nose.
  4. To ejaculate.
  5. (computing) To remove (a data item) from the top of a stack.
    • 2010, Enrico Perla, ‎Massimiliano Oldani, A Guide to Kernel Exploitation: Attacking the Core (page 55)
      Once the callee (the called function) terminates, it cleans the stack that it has been locally using and pops the next value stored on top of the stack.
    • 2011, John Mongan, ‎Noah Kindler, ‎Eric Giguère, Programming Interviews Exposed
      The algorithm pops the stack to obtain a new current node when there are no more children (when it reaches a leaf).
  6. (UK) To place (something) (somewhere).
    Just pop it in the fridge for now.
    • Milton
      He popped a paper into his hand.
  7. (transitive, slang) To swallow (a tablet of a drug).
    • 1994, Ruth Garner and Patricia A. Alexander, Beliefs about text and instruction with text:
      We were drinking beer and popping pills — some really strong downers. I could hardly walk and I had no idea what I was saying.
  8. (transitive, informal) To perform (a move or stunt) while riding a board or vehicle.
    • 1995, David Brin, Startide Rising:
      Huck spun along the beams and joists, making me gulp when she popped a wheelie or swerved past a gaping hole...
    • 2009, Ben Wixon, Skateboarding: Instruction, Programming, and Park Design:
      The tail is the back of the deck; this is the part that enables skaters to pop ollies...
  9. (intransitive, of the ears) To undergo equalization of pressure when the Eustachian tubes open.
    My ears popped as the aeroplane began to ascend.
  10. To make a pop, or sharp, quick sound.
    The muskets popped away on all sides.
  11. To enter, or issue forth, with a quick, sudden movement; to move from place to place suddenly; to dart; with in, out, upon, etc.
    • Shakespeare
      He that killed my king [] / Popp'd in between the election and my hopes.
    • Jonathan Swift
      a trick of popping up and down every moment
  12. To burst open with a pop, when heated over a fire.
    This corn pops well.
  13. To stand out, to be visually distinctive.
    • 2011 July 18, Robert Costa, “The Battle from Waterloo: Representative Bachmann runs for president”, National Review:
      She also looked like a star - and not the Beltway type. On a stage full of stiff suits, she popped.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

pop

  1. Sound made in imitation of the sound.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From papa or poppa

Noun[edit]

pop (plural pops)

  1. (colloquial) Affectionate form of father.
    My pop used to tell me to do my homework every night.
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From popular, by shortening.

Adjective[edit]

pop (not comparable)

  1. (used attributively in set phrases) Popular.

Noun[edit]

pop (uncountable)

  1. Pop music.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop (??? please provide the plural!)

  1. doll

Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin polypus, from Ancient Greek πολύπους (polupous).

Noun[edit]

pop m (plural pops)

  1. octopus
Synonyms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation of popular

Adjective[edit]

pop m, f (invariable)

  1. popular

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop f (plural poppen, diminutive popje n or poppetje n)

  1. doll
  2. cocoon, pupa
  3. (colloquial) guilder
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

pop

  1. first-person singular present indicative of poppen
  2. imperative of poppen

Etymology 2[edit]

From English pop, possibly through shortening of popmuziek.

Noun[edit]

pop m (uncountable)

  1. pop, pop music

Finnish[edit]

Adverb[edit]

pop (not comparable)

  1. pop (popular)

Noun[edit]

pop

  1. pop (popular music)

Declension[edit]


French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pop m (feminine pope, masculine plural pops, feminine plural popes)

  1. pop (popular)

Noun[edit]

pop m (plural pop)

  1. pop, pop music

Synonyms[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

pop

  1. rafsi of porpi.

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Church Slavonic попъ (popŭ), from Ancient Greek παπάς (papás), variant of πάππας (páppas, daddy, papa).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pȍp m (Cyrillic spelling по̏п)

  1. priest (usually Catholic or Orthodox)

Declension[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Church Slavonic попъ (popŭ), from Ancient Greek παπάς (papás), variant of πάππας (páppas, daddy, papa).

Noun[edit]

pop m (genitive singular popa, nominative plural popi), declension pattern chlap

  1. priest (usually Catholic or Orthodox)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English pop.

Noun[edit]

pop m (genitive singular popu), declension pattern dub

  1. pop music, pop
Declension[edit]

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop m

  1. (Uruguay) popcorn

Synonyms[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pop (definite accusative popu, plural poplar)

  1. Pop
  2. Pop music

Declension[edit]