precatory

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin precatorius, from Latin precari to pray.

Adjective[edit]

precatory (comparative more precatory, superlative most precatory)

  1. Expressing a wish.
    • 1827, Sir Walter Scott, The Journal of Sir Walter Scott, "December 1827":
      December 8. . . . A precatory letter from Gillies. I must do Molière for him, I suppose; but it is wonderful that knowing the situation I am in, the poor fellow presses so hard.
  2. (law) Expressing a wish but not creating any legal obligation or duty.
    precatory words in a will

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