profligacy

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

profligate + -y

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

profligacy (countable and uncountable, plural profligacies)

  1. (countable) Careless wastefulness.
    • 1791, Thomas Paine, Rights Of Man
      No question has arisen within the records of history that pressed with the importance of the present. [] whether man shall inherit his rights, and universal civilisation take place? Whether the fruits of his labours shall be enjoyed by himself or consumed by the profligacy of governments?
    • 1935, George Goodchild, chapter 1, Death on the Centre Court:
      She mixed furniture with the same fatal profligacy as she mixed drinks, and this outrageous contact between things which were intended by Nature to be kept poles apart gave her an inexpressible thrill.
    • 2011 April 10, Alistair Magowan, “Aston Villa 1-0 Newcastle”, BBC Sport:
      Villa spent most of the second period probing from wide areas and had a succession of corners but despite their profligacy they will be glad to overturn the 6-0 hammering they suffered at St James' Park in August following former boss Martin O'Neill's departure
  2. (uncountable) Shameless and immoral behaviour.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      He had, indeed, reduced several women to a state of utter profligacy, had broke the hearts of some, and had the honour of occasioning the violent death of one poor girl, who had either drowned herself, or, what was rather more probable, had been drowned by him.

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