proselytus

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Ancient Greek προσήλυτος (prosḗlutos, one that has arrived at [a place]”, “stranger”, “sojourner”; “one who has come over to Judaism”, “convert”, “proselyte).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

prosēlytus m (feminine prosēlyta, neuter prosēlytum); first/second declension

  1. (Late Latin) come from abroad, foreign, strange

Declension[edit]

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative prosēlytus prosēlyta prosēlytum prosēlytī prosēlytae prosēlyta
genitive prosēlytī prosēlytae prosēlytī prosēlytōrum prosēlytārum prosēlytōrum
dative prosēlytō prosēlytae prosēlytō prosēlytīs prosēlytīs prosēlytīs
accusative prosēlytum prosēlytam prosēlytum prosēlytōs prosēlytās prosēlyta
ablative prosēlytō prosēlytā prosēlytō prosēlytīs prosēlytīs prosēlytīs
vocative prosēlyte prosēlyta prosēlytum prosēlytī prosēlytae prosēlyta

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

prosēlytus m (genitive prosēlytī); second declension

  1. (Late Latin) a sojourner, a stranger in the land
  2. (and especially, post-classical) one that has come over from heathenism to the Jewish religion, a proselyte

Declension[edit]

Second declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative prosēlytus prosēlytī
genitive prosēlytī prosēlytōrum
dative prosēlytō prosēlytīs
accusative prosēlytum prosēlytōs
ablative prosēlytō prosēlytīs
vocative prosēlyte prosēlytī

References[edit]

  • prŏsēlytus” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.