purse

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old English purs (purse), partly from Old English pusa (wallet, bag, scrip), and partly from Old English burse (pouch, bag).

Old English pusa comes from Proto-Germanic *pusô (bag, sack, scrip), from Proto-Indo-European *būs- (to swell, stuff), and is cognate with Old High German pfoso (pouch, purse), Low German pūse (purse, bag), Old Norse posi (purse, bag), Danish pose (purse, bag). Old English burse comes from Medieval Latin bursa (leather bag) (compare English bursar), from Ancient Greek βύρσα (búrsa, hide, wine-skin).

Compare also Old French borse (French: bourse), Old Saxon bursa (bag), Old High German burissa (wallet).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

purse (plural purses)

  1. A small bag for carrying money.
    • 1550 Mierdman, Steuen, The market or fayre of usurers
      And then muſt many a man occupie as farre as his purſe would reache, and ſtretche out his legges accordynge to the length of his couerlet.
  2. (US) A handbag (small bag usually used by women for carrying various small personal items)
  3. A quantity of money given for a particular purpose.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses, Episode 12, The Cyclops
      It was a historic and a hefty battle when Myler and Percy were scheduled to don the gloves for the purse of fifty sovereigns.
  4. (historical) A specific sum of money in certain countries: formerly 500 piastres in Turkey or 50 tomans in Persia.

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Verb[edit]

purse (third-person singular simple present purses, present participle pursing, simple past and past participle pursed)

Two people with pursed lips
  1. (transitive) To press (one's lips) in and together so that they protrude.
  2. To draw up or contract into folds or wrinkles; to pucker; to knit.
    • Shakespeare
      Thou [] didst contract and purse thy brow.
  3. To put into a purse.
    • Shakespeare
      I will go and purse the ducats straight.
  4. (intransitive, obsolete, rare) To steal purses; to rob.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      I'll purse: [] I'll bet at bowling alleys.

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Estonian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

purse (genitive purske, partitive purset)

  1. outburst
  2. eruption
  3. explosion
  4. spurt, gush

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

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Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

pursua, pursuta >

Noun[edit]

purse

  1. (metallurgy) flash

Declension[edit]