quine

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From the name of the logician Willard van Orman Quine, via Douglas Hofstadter.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

quine (plural quines)

  1. (computing) A program that produces its own source code as output.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

quine (third-person singular simple present quines, present participle quining, simple past and past participle quined)

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (philosophy) To deny the existence or significance of something obviously real or important.
    • 1993, Howard Margolis, Paradigms and Barriers: How Habits of Mind Govern Scientific Beliefs, University of Chicago Press (ISBN 9780226505237), page 62
      As with the puzzle of what happens during the combustion of a metal in pure oxygen (the "steel wool" experiment), this result can of course be quined. Taking the phlogistic view, we could say that the calx requires the same phlogiston content as the metal, so of course the amount of water absorbed must be in accord with that.
    • 1999, Denis Fisette, Consciousness and Intentionality: Models and Modalities of Attribution, Springer (ISBN 9780792359074), page 119
      They deny that mental states and events actually possess the qualitative properties attributed to them by qualia friends and, as a consequence, they advocate quining qualia.
    • Don Ross, Introduction: The Dennettian Stance in 2000, Don Ross, Andrew Brook and David Thompson, Dennett’s Philosophy: A Comprehensive Assessment, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, page 14:
      Qualia are quined not because Dennett imagines that there is nothing it is like to be conscious, but because no clear demarcation can be drawn between representations of qualitative properties and representations of other sorts of states.
    • 2001, Nenad Miscevic, "Quining the apriori", Knowledge, Language and Logic: Questions for Quine (edited by A. Orenstein, P. Kotatko), Springer (ISBN 9781402002533), page 95
    • 2003, W. Martin Davies, The Philosophy of Sir William Mitchell (1861-1962): A Mind's Own Place, Edwin Mellen Press Limited, page 182:
      Structure in the phenomenological realm is not something to be “quined”, but fostered.
    • 2003, Roy Sorensen, A Brief History of the Paradox: Philosophy and the Labyrinths of the Mind: Philosophy and the Labyrinths of the Mind, Oxford University Press (ISBN 9780199728572), page 357
      Daniel Dennett's The Philosophical Lexicon defines "quine" as a verb: "to deny the existence or significance of something real or significant". Quine has quined names, intentions, and the distinction between psychology and epistemology. In 1951 Quine quined the distinction between analytic and synthetic statements.
    • 2008, Daniel Barnett, Movement as Meaning: In Experimental Film, Rodopi (ISBN 9789042023857), page 114
      The private language machine and the evolution of a medium: One of the things that Wittgenstein is most famous for is quining "private language". By saying that private languages can't exist Wittgenstein wanted us to recognize the inescapable function of the social fabric in language's work.
    • Andrew Pessin, Mental Transparency, Direct Sensaition, and the Unity of the Cartesian Mind in 2009, Jon Miller, Topics in Early Modern Philosophy of Mind, Springer, page 34:
      One might object that in this section I’ve not exactly quined Cartesian qualia, []

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Variant of quean, cognate with English queen.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

quine (plural quines)

  1. (Doric) young woman, girl, daughter