ramp

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From French rampe, back-formation of Old French ramper, from Frankish *rampōn, *hrampōn (to contract oneself), akin to Old English hrimpan (to wrinkle, rimple, rumple), Old High German rimpfan (German rümpfen (to wrinkle up)). Compare Danish rimpe (to fold" (archaic), "to baste), Icelandic rimpa. More at rimple.

Noun[edit]

ramp (plural ramps)

  1. An inclined surface that connects two levels; an incline.
  2. A road that connects a freeway to a surface street or another freeway.
  3. (aviation) A mobile staircase that is attached to the doors of an aircraft at an airport
  4. (aviation) A place where an aircraft parks, next to a terminal, for loading and unloading (see also apron)
  5. (skating) A construction used to do skating tricks, usually in the form of part of a pipe.
  6. A speed bump

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

ramp (third-person singular simple present ramps, present participle ramping, simple past and past participle ramped)

  1. To behave violently; to rage.
  2. To spring; to leap; to bound, rear, or prance; to move swiftly or violently.
    • Spenser
      Their bridles they would champ, / And trampling the fine element would fiercely ramp.
  3. To climb, like a plant; to creep up.
    • Ray
      With claspers and tendrils, they [plants] catch hold, [] and so ramping upon trees, they mount up to a great height.
  4. To stand in a rampant position.
  5. (intransitive) To change value, often at a steady rate
    • 2007, Sean Meyn, Control Techniques for Complex Networks (page 285)
      If Q(t) < qp then primary generation ramps up at maximal rate, subject to the constraint that Q(t) does not exceed this threshold.
    • 2011, Sheng Liu, Yong Liu, Modeling and Simulation for Microelectronic Packaging Assembly
      The forces are ramped down gradually to ensure that element removal has a smooth effect on the model.
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Etymology 2[edit]

ramp - Allium tricoccum

See ramson.

Noun[edit]

ramp (plural ramps)

  1. An American plant, Allium tricoccum, related to the onion; a wild leek.
    • 2006, Su Clauson-Wicker, Off the Beaten Path West Virginia, volume 6‎:
      A ramp is a potently flavored wild scallion, a vegetable with staying power.
  2. (Appalachia) A promiscuous man or woman; a general insult for a worthless person.
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Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch ramp (misfortune). Related to rimpel (wrinkle). In the 19th century, the grammatical gender of the word was a matter of debate. It was finally standardized as feminine, departing from its historical masculine gender.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ramp f (plural rampen, diminutive rampje n)

  1. disaster
Derived terms[edit]

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Etymology 2[edit]

From English ramp.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ramp m (plural ramps, diminutive rampje n)

  1. (skating) A construction to do skating tricks, usually in the form of one half of a pipe, a half-pipe.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to rimpel (wrinkle).

Noun[edit]

ramp m

  1. bird claw disease, bird cramp
  2. epilepsy, (human) cramp
  3. disaster, misfortune