rick

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See also: Rick

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English *rykke, from Old English hrycce (rick, heap, pile), cognate with Scots ruk (rick), Norwegian ruka (rick, haystack). Related also to Old English hrēac (rick, stack), from Proto-Germanic *hraukaz (heap). Further relations: Dutch rook, Norwegian rauk, Swedish rök, Icelandic hraukur.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

rick (plural ricks)

  1. A stack, stook or pile of grain, straw, hay etc., especially as protected with thatching.
    • George Eliot (1819-1880)
      There is a remnant still of last year's golden clusters of beehive ricks, rising at intervals beyond the hedgerows; []
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, chapter 1, The Amateur Poacher:
      As one sat on the sward behind the elm, with the back turned on the rick and nothing in front but the tall elms and the oaks in the other hedge, it was quite easy to fancy it the verge of the prairie with the backwoods close by.
  2. (US) A stack of wood, especially cut to a regular length; also used as a measure of wood, typically four by eight feet.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

rick (third-person singular simple present ricks, present participle ricking, simple past and past participle ricked)

  1. To heap up (hay, etc.) in ricks.

Etymology 2[edit]

Middle English wricke

Verb[edit]

rick (third-person singular simple present ricks, present participle ricking, simple past and past participle ricked)

  1. slightly sprain or strain the neck, back, ankle etc.

Etymology 3[edit]

Abbreviated form from recruit

Noun[edit]

rick (plural ricks)

  1. (military, pejorative and demeaning) A brand new (naive) boot camp inductee.
    No turning back now rick, you are property of the US government, no longer protected by the bill of rights; you follow the UCMJ now.