rightwise

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English rightwise, rightwis, from Old English rihtwīs (righteous, just; right, justifiable), corresponding to right +‎ -wise. The second element was later confused with or assimilated to -ous, leading to the modern spelling righteous.[1]

Adjective[edit]

rightwise (comparative more rightwise, superlative most rightwise)

  1. Obsolete spelling of righteous. [13th-16th century]
    • 1525?, William Tyndale, Tyndale Bible
      I came not to call the rightwise but the synners to repentaunce.
    • 1531, Sir Thomas Elyot, The Boke named The Governour: Book III
      And Plato sayeth that it is extreme iniustice he to seme rightwise which in dede is uniuste.
    • 2006, Percy Grainger, edited by Malcolm Gillies, David Pear, and Mark Carroll, Self-portrait of Percy Grainger, page 167:
      Man feels maddened by his pent-uppness, & woman seems to understand that a rightwise man's cruel-fain-th is part of his hunger for women.

References[edit]

  1. ^
    1905, Richard Chenevix Trench, English Past and Present[1], edition Reprint, Project Gutenberg, published 2007:
    ...'righteousness', or 'rightwiseness', as it would once more accurately have been written, for 'righteous' is a corruption of 'rightwise', remains, but its correspondent 'wrongwiseness' has been taken;

Etymology 2[edit]

Presumably from Old English rihtwīs, reinforced by reanalysis as right +‎ wise.

Adverb[edit]

rightwise (not comparable)

  1. (rare) Rightly (correctly or justly); rightfully.
    • 1915, Howard Pyle, The story of King Arthur and his knights (page 36)
      And, after that fourth trial, sundry of the kings and many of the lesser barons and knights and all of the commons cried out that these were trials enough, and that Arthur had assuredly approved himself to be rightwise King []
    • 1969, in Topic, issues 17-18, page 37:
      [] made indubitably clear that Arthur was rightwise king of the realm []
    • 2003, Nancy McKenzie, Grail Prince, page 192:
      "That it was Maximus's sword which Merlin found for Arthur and fixed in the stone of Lludyn's Hill by magic arts so that none but he who was rightwise born King of all the Britons could pull it out."

Etymology 3[edit]

right +‎ -wise

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

rightwise (not comparable)

  1. (rare) By a rightward path; rightwards, rightwardly; clockwise (in a clockwise manner).
    • 1890, G. C. Macaulay, The History of Herodotus, translated into English:
      and doing so they say that they do it themselves rightwise and the Hellenes leftwise.
    • 2004, Christian P. Robert, George Casella, Monte Carlo statistical methods, page 336:
      Similarly, his "doubling procedure" consists in the same random starting interval [] whose length is doubled (leftwise or rightwise at random) recursively till both ends are outside the slice.
References[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rightwise

  1. (rare) Rightward (to or from the right side); on the right side.
    • 1866, Specifications and drawings of patents relating to electricity issued by the United States from July 1, 1884, to July 1, 1885, volume 39, published by the United States Patent Office:
      [] that, abutting against the end of H, or nearly so, it will lock said bar as against a return or rightwise motion, and then said bar will be locked as against a reverse motion, and, being locked, its flop D cannot be rotated back, []
    • 2006, Arne Røkkum, Nature, ritual, and society in Japan's Ryukyu Islands, page 151:
      The leftwise action aims at what drifts out of the nunka domain of the nefarious. Similarly for mortuary arrangements, what is leftwise is more momentous than what is rightwise.
  2. (rare) Clockwise, moving clockwise.
    • 1966, P. H. Pott, Yoga and yantra: their interrelation and their significance for Indian archeology, page 66:
      In Tibet the compass points are described in a rightwise circle; one speaks there of east-south and west-north instead of south-east and north-west.
    • 2006, Steve Lawhead, The Silver Hand, page 20:
      Then he stepped before me, and I bade him walk three times in a rightwise circle around me. "This is embarrassing," he growled through clenched teeth as he passed the first time.
Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rightwise

  1. upright, righteous
    • 1407, The Testimony of William Thorpe, pages 40–41
      And I seide, “Ser, in his tyme maister Ioon Wiclef was holden of ful many men the grettis clerk that thei knewen lyuynge vpon erthe. And therwith he was named, as I gesse worthili, a passing reuli man and an innocent in al his lyuynge. And herfore grete men of kunnynge and other also drowen myche to him, and comownede ofte with him. And thei sauouriden so his loore that thei wroten it bisili and enforsiden hem to rulen hem theraftir… Maister Ion Aston taughte and wroot acordingli and ful bisili, where and whanne and to whom he myghte, and he vsid it himsilf, I gesse, right perfyghtli vnto his lyues eende. Also Filip of Repintoun whilis he was a chanoun of Leycetre, Nycol Herforde, dane Geffrey of Pikeringe, monke of Biland and a maistir dyuynyte, and Ioon Purueye, and manye other whiche weren holden rightwise men and prudent, taughten and wroten bisili this forseide lore of Wiclef, and conformeden hem therto. And with alle these men I was ofte homli and I comownede with hem long tyme and fele, and so bifore alle othir men I chees wilfulli to be enformed bi hem and of hem, and speciali of Wiclef himsilf, as of the moost vertuous and goodlich wise man that I herde of owhere either knew. And herfore of Wicleef speciali and of these men I toke the lore whiche I haue taughte and purpose to lyue aftir, if God wole, to my lyues ende.”

Adverb[edit]

rightwise (not comparable)

  1. rightly (correctly or justly)

Related terms[edit]