roll off the tongue

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
(Redirected from roll from the tongue)
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

roll off the tongue

  1. (idiomatic, of words, speech, etc.) To proceed into oral expression in a manner which is fluent, appealing, or glib.
    • 1914, Julian Hawthorne, The Subterranean Brotherhood, ch. 5:
      "Coddling criminals"—the alliteration makes it roll pleasantly off the tongue!
    • 1915, Joseph A. Altsheler, The Rock of Chickamauga, ch. 14:
      [H]e repeated under his breath: "The Rock of Chickamauga! The Rock of Chickamauga!" It rolled resoundingly off the tongue, and he liked it.
    • 1978 Nov. 20, "Dance: Fungus, Fantasy and Fun," Time:
      Pilobolus is a word so fine and fat as it rolls off the tongue that, like a kitten or a May morning, it needs no meaning.
    • 2012 July 14, Kate Murphy, "Eric Stonestreet," New York Times (retrieved 14 Aug 2012):
      I’m a fan of Aaron Sorkin. . . . I just like the way his dialogue rolls off the tongue. I like to hear people say the words he writes.

References[edit]