sam

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Acronym

Alternative forms[edit]

Acronym[edit]

sam

  1. Surface-to-air missile

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English sammen, samnen, from Old English samnian, ġesamnian (to collect, assemble, bring together, gather, join, unite, compose, meet, glean), from Proto-Germanic *samnōną (to gather), from Proto-Indo-European *sem- (one). Cognate with Dutch zamelen (to collect), German sammeln (to collect, gather), Swedish samla (to gather, collect), Icelandic samna (to gather, collect). More at same.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

sam (third-person singular simple present sams, present participle samming, simple past and past participle sammed)

  1. (transitive, UK dialectal) To assemble.
  2. (transitive, UK dialectal) (of persons) To bring together; join (in marriage, friendship, love, etc.).
  3. (transitive, UK dialectal) (of things) To bring together; collect; put in order; arrange.
  4. (intransitive, UK dialectal) To assemble; come together.
  5. (transitive, UK dialectal) To coagulate; curdle (milk).
Usage notes[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sam (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) together
    • Spenser
      Now are they saints in all in that city sam.

Etymology 3[edit]

Possibly from Uncle Sam

Noun[edit]

sam (plural sams)

  1. (slang) Federal narcotics agent.

Anagrams[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

sam

  1. rafsi of skami.

Mizo[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *(t)sam.

Noun[edit]

sam

  1. hair (of the head)
  2. antenna (of insects)

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sam

  1. easy, simple

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *samos (summer) (compare Welsh haf), from Proto-Indo-European *sm̥-h₂-ó- (compare Old English sumor, Old Armenian ամառն (amaṙn)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sam m

  1. summer

Synonyms[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *samъ, from Proto-Indo-European *somHós.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sam m (not always comparable, comparative bardziej sam, superlative najbardziej sam)

  1. (comparable) alone
  2. (not comparable) Emphatic determiner: used similarly to "no other than" or "the very"

Usage notes[edit]

May be also used in an adverbial meaning of "by oneself" or "on one's own", similar to English alone; in this meaning, it still behaves like an adjective grammatically, and is not comparable.

Declension[edit]


Rohingya[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Bengali.

Noun[edit]

sam

  1. skin

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *samъ, from Proto-Indo-European *somHós.

Adjective[edit]

sȃm (definite sȃmī, Cyrillic spelling са̑м)

  1. alone, sole
  2. the very
  3. unaided, single-handed
  4. absolute, mere, unmixed
  5. solitary, secluded
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *(j)esmь, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *esmi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésmi.

Verb[edit]

sȁm (Cyrillic spelling са̏м)

  1. first-person singular present tense enclitic form of biti.
    Tu sam. — I'm here.

Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *samъ, from Proto-Indo-European *somHós.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sám (not comparable)

  1. alone, sole
  2. unaided, single-handed, by oneself

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]