sango

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See also: Sango and ŝanĝo

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From sandwich +‎ -o (diminutive suffix). Australian from 1940s.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sango (plural sangos or sangoes)

  1. (dated, Australia, informal, colloquial) A sandwich. [From 1940s.]
Usage notes[edit]

Now more common is sanger.

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Macquarie Slang Dictionary lists sanger, with sango under “also”.

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

sango (plural sangos)

  1. (UK) A rudimentary wooden bridge in India.
    • 1824, Alexander Gerard, Journal of an Excursion through the Himalayah Mountains, from Shipke to the Frontiers of Chinese Tartary, David Brewster (editor), The Edinburgh Journal of Science, Volume 1: April—October, page 219,
      We crossed it and another stream a little above their union by a couple of bad sangos, and ascended from its bed by a rocky footpath, winding amongst extensive forests of oak, yew, pine, and horse chesnut, to Camp.
    • 1865, Henry Astbury Leveson, The Hunting Grounds of the Old World, page 459,
      Four large mountain torrents, the Dangalee, Dubrane, Loarnad, and Rindee Gadh, join the Ganges from the left bank, and have to be crossed by sangos.

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Esperanto Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia eo

Etymology[edit]

From Italian sangue, from Latin sanguis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsanɡo/
  • IPA(key): /ˈsaŋɡo/ (considered by some to be incorrect)
  • Hyphenation: san‧go

Noun[edit]

sango (uncountable, accusative sangon)

  1. blood

Derived terms[edit]


Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Esperanto sango, from Italian sangue, from Latin sanguis.

Noun[edit]

sango (uncountable)

  1. blood

Derived terms[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sango

  1. rōmaji reading of さんご