scat

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English scet, schat, from Old English sceatt (property, goods, owndom, wealth, treasure; payment, price, gift, bribe, tax, tribute, money, goods, reward, rent, a tithe; a piece of money, a coin; denarius, twentieth part of a shilling) and Old Norse skattr (wealth, treaure, tax, tribute, coin); both from Proto-Germanic *skattaz (cattle, kine, wealth, owndom, goods, hoard, treasure, geld, money), from Proto-Indo-European *skatn-, *skat- (to jump, skip, splash out). Cognate with Scots scat (tax, levy, charge, payment, bribe), West Frisian skat (treasure, darling), Dutch schat (treasure, hoard, darling, sweetheart), German Schatz (treasure, hoard, wealth, store, darling, sweetheart), Swedish skatt (treasure, tax, duty), Icelandic skattur (tax, tribute), Latin scateō (gush, team, bubble forth, abound).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

scat (plural scats)

  1. A tax; tribute.
  2. (UK dialectal) A land-tax paid in the Shetland Islands.

Etymology 2[edit]

Origin uncertain. Perhaps from English dialectal scat (to scatter, fling down, bespatter), or an alteration of shit (past tense shat; compare Old English scāt), also used for "drugs, heroin". Given the given popular character of the word and unmotivated derivation pattern, derivation from Ancient Greek σκῶρ (skôr, excrement) is unlikely [1]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • skatt (brisk shower of rain)

Noun[edit]

scat (uncountable)

  1. (biology) Animal excrement; dung.
  2. (slang) Heroin.
  3. (slang, obsolete) Whiskey.
  4. (slang) Coprophilia.
    • 1988, “Pete”, quoted in Seymour Kleinberg, Alienated Affections: Being Gay in America, Macmillan, ISBN 978-0-312-02158-0, page 183:
      Enema queens, like scat queens, are really the scum of the earth.
    • 1998, Dennis Cooper, Guide, Grove Press, ISBN 978-0-8021-3580-3, page 170:
      [] I hear he’s into S&M and scat and all kinds of kinky shit. []
    • 2004, Phineas Mollod and Jason Tesauro, The Modern Lover: A Playbook for Suitors, Spouses & Ringless Carousers, Ten Speed Press, ISBN 978-1-58008-601-1, page 72:
      In short, when venturing into the realm of extreme fetish, ensure you have an extreme understanding of a partner’s boundaries before laying down a plastic tarp for scat play.
  5. (UK, dialect) A brisk shower of rain, driven by the wind.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)
    When Halldown has a hat, Let Kenton beware of a Skatt. — Risdon.
Translations[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Probably imitative.

Noun[edit]

scat (plural scats)

  1. (music, jazz) Scat singing.

Verb[edit]

scat (third-person singular simple present scats, present participle scatting, simple past and past participle scatted)

  1. (music, jazz) To sing an improvised melodic solo using nonsense syllables, often onomatopoeic or imitative of musical instruments.

Etymology 4[edit]

Perhaps from the interjection scat!, itself an interjectional form of scoot! or scout!, from the root of shoot. Alternatively, from the expression quicker than s'cat (in a great hurry), perhaps representing a hiss followed by the word cat. Compare Swedish schas! (shoo!, begone!).

Verb[edit]

scat (third-person singular simple present scats, present participle scatting, simple past and past participle scatted)

  1. (colloquial) To leave quickly (often used in the imperative).
    Here comes the principal; we'd better scat.
  2. (colloquial) An imperative demand, often understood by speaker and listener as impertinent.
    Scat! Go on! Get out of here!
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

    • ^ 2012, Dictionary.com Unabridged, Based on the Random House Dictionary, "scat"

    Anagrams[edit]


    Old Saxon[edit]

    Noun[edit]

    scat m

    1. Alternative spelling of skat.