scathel

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English scathel (harmful), from Old English *sceaþol, from Proto-Germanic *skaþulaz (harmful), equivalent to scathe +‎ -le. Cognate with Old High German scadel (injurious, harmful), Gothic [script?] (skaþuls, injurious, wicked). [script?]

Adjective[edit]

scathel (comparative more scathel, superlative most scathel)

  1. Harmful; noxious; injurious; mischievous.
    • 1880, Joseph Angus, The handbook of specimens of English literature:
      Many a lad there forth leapt, to lave and to cast / Scopen out the scathel water that fayn scape wolde

Noun[edit]

scathel (plural scathels)

  1. Hurt; injury.

Related terms[edit]