seg

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See also: SEG and -ség

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English segge, from Old English secg (man, warrior, hero), from Proto-Germanic *sagjaz (follower, retainer, warrior), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (to follow, accompany). Cognate with Norwegian segg, Icelandic seggur (bully).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

seg (plural segs)

  1. (archaic) A man; warrior; hero.
  2. (UK dialectal) A man; fellow.

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from the root of Latin secare (to cut).

Noun[edit]

seg (plural segs)

  1. (UK, Scotland, dialect) A castrated bull.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Etymology 3[edit]

Short for segregation.

Noun[edit]

seg (plural segs)

  1. (US prison slang, uncountable) Segregation
    • 1988 July 15, Albert Williams, “Prison Drama”:
      [] when a prisoner is transferred or paroled or sent to "seg" (segregation) or hauled back into court, they don't ask if he's busy with a lead role in a play.

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

seg (plural segs)

  1. A metal stud or plate fixed to the sole or heel of a shoe to prevent excessive wear. Also known as a blakey.
  2. (dialect) A callus, an area of hardened skin.

Etymology 5[edit]

See sedge.

Noun[edit]

seg

  1. sedge
  2. gladen, or other species of Iris
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Verb[edit]

seg (present seg, present participle seggende, past participle gesê)

  1. Obsolete form of .

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sik, from Proto-Germanic *sek, from Proto-Indo-European *se.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

seg accusative reflexive

  1. oneself, himself, herself, itself, themselves

Declension[edit]

Reflexive pronouns - Afturbent fornavn
Singular (eintal), Plural (fleirtal) 3. m, f, n
Nominative (hvørfall)
Accusative (hvønnfall) seg
Dative (hvørjumfall) sær
Genitive (hvørsfall) sín

References[edit]

  • Höskuldur Thráinsson, Hjalmar P. Petersen, Jógvan í Lon Jacobsen, Zakaris Svabo Hansen: Faroese : An Overview and Reference Grammar. Tórshavn: Føroya Fróðskaparfelag, 2004 (p. 119 f., 325 ff.)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

seg - reflexive pronoun

  1. (with verb) oneself; itself; himself/herself
  2. (with verb) one, him, her, it, them
  3. (with verb) themselves

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sik.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

seg

  1. (with verb) oneself; itself; himself/herself
  2. (with verb) one, him, her, it, them
  3. (with verb) themselves

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]