seisin

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English[edit]

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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English seysen, from Old French seisin, from the verb seisir, from Vulgar Latin *saciō, from the same Proto-Indo-European root as Gothic 𐍃𐌰𐍄𐌾𐌰𐌽 (satjan) and Old English settan. More at seize.

Noun[edit]

seisin (plural seisins)

  1. (law, common law, historical) A feudal term for an entitlement to a freehold estate with a right to immediate possession; still used in technical discussions of real property law today.
  2. (obsolete) The act of taking possession.
  3. (obsolete) The thing possessed; property.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir M. Hale to this entry?)

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

seisin m (oblique plural seisins, nominative singular seisins, nominative plural seisin)

  1. act of seizing

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]