sel

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See also: Sel and -sel

Cahuilla[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sél

  1. flower

Extremaduran[edit]

Verb[edit]

sel

  1. to be

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-.

Noun[edit]

sel m (plural sels)

  1. table salt, i.e. sodium chloride (NaCl)
  2. (chemistry) salt
  3. (in the plural) smelling salts

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

sel

  1. rafsi of se.

Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

sel m (plural sels)

  1. salt

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse selr.

Noun[edit]

sel m

  1. seal (animal)

Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]


Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Proto-Germanic *salą, from Indo-European. Cognate with Old High German sal, German Saal (hall, large room), Old Saxon sal, Dutch zaal. Compare sele, from a Germanic variant stem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sel n

  1. room, great hall, (large) house, castle
    Heorot, sincfāge sel ― Heorot, richly adorned hall.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sēl (comparative sēlla, superlative sēlest)

  1. good, noble
    Sōna ic wæs wyrpende and mē sēl wæs. ― Soon I was recovering and I was better.
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1916, John R. Clark, "A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary for the Use of Students", sel et al.
  • Bosworth, J. (2010, March 21). An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online (T. N. Toller & Others, Eds.), sel.

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl.

Noun[edit]

sel m (oblique plural seaus or seax or siaus or siax or sels, nominative singular seaus or seax or siaus or siax or sels, nominative plural sel)

  1. salt

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) sal

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ls.

Noun[edit]

sel m

  1. (Puter) salt

Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sъlъ, from the same root as sláti.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sèl m anim (genitive slà, nominative plural slì)

  1. messenger

Declension[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Arabic سيل (sayl).

Noun[edit]

sel

  1. flood