sele

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See also: śele

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sele (Happiness, good fortune, bliss; an occasion, period of time), from Old English sǣl, sel

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sele (plural seles)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal) Happiness, fortune.
  2. (obsolete or dialectal) The right time or occasion for something, an opportune moment.
  3. greeting, salutation
    • 1862, George Borrow, “Chapter XXXV”, in Wild Wales Its People‚ Language and Scenery[1], Fiction, Read Central:
      I found my friend honest Pritchard smoking his morning pipe at the front door, and after giving him the sele of the day, ...
    • 1897, William Morris, “Chapter XIV. The Black Knight Tells the Truth of Himself”, in The Water of the Wondrous Isles, Fantasy, Project Gutenberg, published 2005:
      When the morning was come ... so she arose and thrust her grief back into her heart, and gave her fellow-farer the sele of the day, ...

Anagrams[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sele m sg (feminine singular [[{{{1}}}a#Asturian|{{{1}}}a]], neuter singular [[{{{1}}}o#Asturian|{{{1}}}o]], masculine plural [[{{{1}}}os#Asturian|{{{1}}}os]], feminine plural [[{{{1}}}es#Asturian|{{{1}}}es]])

  1. calm, tranquil

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

sele n

  1. piglet

Declension[edit]


Fijian[edit]

Noun[edit]

sele

  1. knife

Verb[edit]

sele

  1. cut (with a knife)

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Proto-Germanic *saliz, from Proto-Indo-European *sel-. Cognate with Old Saxon seli,', Old High German sali, Old Norse salr (Swedish sal), Lombardic sala; and with Old Church Slavonic (and Russian) село (selo). There was also a Germanic variant *saloz-, Old English sæl (great hall, (large) house, castle).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sele m (nominative plural selas)

  1. great hall, house, dwelling, prison
    Winter ýþe beleác ísgebinde óþ ðæt óðer com geár in geardas swá nú gyt déþ ða ðe sele bewitiaþ wuldortorhtan weder. — Winter locks the waves with bonds of ice until another year came to the dwellings of those who keep a constant watch for good weather. Beowulf
  2. tabernacle, gesele

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1916, John R. Clark, "A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary for the Use of Students", sele et al.
  • Bosworth, J. (2010, March 21). An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online (T. N. Toller & Others, Eds.), sele

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin sella

Noun[edit]

sele f (oblique plural seles, nominative singular sele, nominative plural seles)

  1. saddle (equipment used on a horse)

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

sele

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of selar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of selar
  3. first-person singular imperative of selar
  4. third-person singular imperative of selar