slug

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English[edit]

Slug.
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Etymology[edit]

Originally referred to a lazy person, from Middle English slugge, probably of Scandinavian/Old Norse origin; compare dialectal Norwegian sluggje (heavy, slow person).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

slug (plural slugs)

  1. Any of many terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks, having no (or only rudimentary) shell
  2. (obsolete) A slow, lazy person; a sluggard.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?) Why, lamb! Why, lady! Fie, you slug-a-bed. Romeo and Juliet
  3. A bullet (projectile).
  4. A counterfeit coin, especially one used to steal from vending machines.
  5. A shot of a drink, usually alcoholic.
  6. (journalism) A title, name or header, a catchline, a short phrase or title to indicate the content of a newspaper or magazine story for editing use.
  7. (physics, rarely used) the Imperial (English) unit of mass that accelerates by 1 foot per second squared (1 ft/s²) when a force of one pound-force (lbf) is exerted on it.
  8. A discrete mass of a material that moves as a unit, usually through another material.
    • 1973, Pulp & paper international, volume 15: 
      When these layers are recovered they inevitably result in a slug of sawdust which goes into the digester and tends to plug the screens in a Kamyr digester.
    • 1987, United States. Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, United States. Board of Mine Operations Appeals, Occupational safety and health decisions:
      Then, just a few nights before August 6, Gilbert testified that a "slug of sand-rock" weighing an estimate of one to two tons fell on his continuous miner as he was taking a cut, approximately fifteen feet from where he was standing.
    • 1998, Orrin H. Pilkey; Katharine L. Dixon, The Corps and the Shore, page 159:
      Tvpically, enough sand is emplaced to create a slug of sand that moves along the shore causing noticeable and somewhat dramatic local changes.
    • 1998, N. A. Krylov; A. A. Bokserman, Evgeniĭ Romanovich Stavrovskiĭ, The oil industry of the former Soviet Union, page 112:
    • 2005, Sam Mannan; Frank P. Lees, Lee's loss prevention in the process industries, page 16-115:
      Another phenomenon investigated was a slug of water falling through the cloud.
    • 2007, William Lauer; Fred Sanchez, Disinfection of pipelines and storage facilities field guide, page 54:
      This method uses a slug of 100 mg/L chlorinated water as a slug that moves along the length of the pipeline. The slug is a percentage of the total length of the pipeline.
    • 2010, Nancy E. McTigue; James M. Symons, American Water Works Association, The water dictionary: a comprehensive reference of water terminology, page 556:
      For example, a slug of iron rust might appear because of the shearing action of a high-demand flow that loosens a previously deposited iron precipitate.
    • 2010, Robert A. Meyers, Extreme Environmental Events, page 1198:
      These experiments investigate the ascent of a slug of gas in a vertical liquid-filed tube featuring a flare that abruptly doubles the cross sectional area.
    • 2011, Bill Calfee, The Art of Rimfire Accuracy, page 125:
      You had to learn to grab the teat up next to the udder with your thumb and side of your first finger, grab a slug of milk and progressively squeeze it down the teat past your middle finger, ring finger and little finger
  9. A motile pseudoplasmodium formed by amoebae working together.
  10. (television editing) A black screen.
  11. (letterpress typography) A piece of type metal imprinted by a Linotype machine; also a black mark placed in the margin to indicate an error.
  12. (regional) A stranger picked up as a passenger to enable legal use of high occupancy vehicle lanes.
  13. (web design) The last part of a clean URL, the displayed resource name, similar to a filename.
  14. (obsolete) A hindrance; an obstruction.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  15. A ship that sails slowly.
    • Samuel Pepys
      His rendezvous for his fleet, and for all slugs to come to, should be between Calais and Dover.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

slug (third-person singular simple present slugs, present participle slugging, simple past and past participle slugged)

  1. To drink quickly; to gulp.
  2. To down a shot.
  3. (transitive) To hit very hard, usually with the fist.
    He insulted my mother, so I slugged him.
    The fighter slugged his opponent into unconsciousness.
  4. To take part in casual carpooling; to form ad hoc, informal carpools for commuting, essentially a variation of ride-share commuting and hitchhiking.
    • 1998 July 23, “Ramsey Vows to Find New Sites for Commuter `Slug Lines'”, Washington Post:
      "We believe in car-pooling, but let's do it without restricting traffic. ..." Sam Snyder, 51, of Burke, who has been slugging to his job at the US Customs ....
    • 2002 December 13, Joshua E. Rodd, dc.urban-planning, Usenet:
      no sane person would attempt to commute that far every day. Sure they do. I've often slugged to Fredericksburg and back. The VRE carries hundreds of people per day, and the I-95 HOV lanes carry tens of thousands of people each day.
  5. (intransitive, of a bullet) To become reduced in diameter, or changed in shape, by passing from a larger to a smaller part of the bore of the barrel.
  6. (obsolete, intransitive) To move slowly or sluggishly; to lie idle.
    • Spenser
      To slug in sloth and sensual delight.
  7. (transitive) To load with a slug or slugs.
    to slug a gun
  8. To make sluggish.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Manx[edit]

Verb[edit]

slug (verbal noun sluggey, past participle sluggit)

  1. to swallow, swig, slug, guzzle, draw
  2. to devour, gorge, gulp
  3. to engulf

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
slug lug
after "yn", tlug
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Noun[edit]

slug m (genitive slug, plural sluggyn)

  1. swallow, swig, draught

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
slug lug
after "yn", tlug
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

slug

  1. cunning