slush

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English[edit]

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Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Most likely imitative; related to slosh.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

slush (plural slushes)

  1. Half-melted snow or ice.
    As the skiing season drew to an end, there was nothing but slush left on the piste.
  2. Liquid mud or mire.
  3. Flavored shaved ice served as a drink.
  4. A soft mixture of grease and other materials, used for lubrication.
  5. The refuse grease and fat collected in cooking, especially on shipboard.
  6. (engineering) A mixture of white lead and lime, used as a paint to prevent oxidation.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

slush (third-person singular simple present slushes, present participle slushing, simple past and past participle slushed)

  1. To smear with slushy liquid or grease.
    • 2008 July 9, Donald G. Mcneil, “Restless Pioneers, Seeding Brooklyn”, New York Times:
      The ungrateful “they” are Brooklynites who’ve come to see Harding-Mamary creations as a chain, where you can get it venti in a ramekin with crème fraîche or slushed with guava and salt on the rim.
  2. To slosh or splash; to move as, or through, a slushy or liquid substance.
    • 1902, Jack London, The Cruise of the Dazzler[1]:
      The water was soon slushing merrily over the deck, while the smoke pouring from the cabin stove carried a promise of good things to come.
    • 1994 March 4, Dave Wiethop, Sandi Abadinski, “Reader to Reader”, Chicago Reader:
      Sitting inside the Starbucks on Broadway near Roscoe, two art students had tired of sketching people slushing through the two-day-old snow.
    • 1919, F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise[2]:
      A belated freshman, his oilskin slicker rasping loudly, slushed along the soft path.
    • 1918, Randall Parrish, Wolves of the Sea[3]:
      The deck below me was littered with chests, sea boots, and odds and ends of clothing, while farther aft considerable water had found entrance through the scuttle hole, and was slushing back and forth as the bark rolled.
    • 1907, Nicholas Carter, A Woman at Bay[4]:
      They climbed over fallen and moss-grown logs; they slushed through shallow water; they crawled on their hands and knees under embankments and rocks, and at last, at Handsome's order, they stepped into a boat of some kind which the latter pushed away from the bank with a pole.
    • 1888, Wilfrid Chateauclair, The Young Seigneur[5]:
      But as the boat stuck in the bottom and refused to stir, he suddenly dropped his hold, and with an "Avance done!" gallantly slushed his way into the water alongside, in his Sunday trousers, lifted the gunwale and started her afloat, amidst a shower of final "Au revoirs," and the rose chaloupe moved with noiseless smoothness down the current.
    • 1867, Frank Jardine and Alexander Jardine, The Overland Expedition of The Messrs. Jardine[6]:
      The creek at last crossed, the party attempted to push forward on the other side, but after travelling a mile leading the horses, slushing through bog and swamp under a heavy rain, they were obliged to turn back and encamp on some high ground on the banks of the creek, about half-a-mile above the crossing, where there was a little good grass.
  3. To paint with a mixture of white lead and lime.

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

slush

  1. slush (icy drink)

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]