smack

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English smac, smak, smacke, from Old English smæċ (taste, smatch), from Proto-Germanic *smakkuz (a taste), from Proto-Indo-European *smegʰ-, *smeg- (to taste). Cognate with English dialectal smatch, Scots smak (scent, smell, taste, flavour), Saterland Frisian Smoak (taste), West Frisian smaak (taste), Dutch smaak (taste), German Schmack, Geschmack (taste), Swedish smak (taste). Akin to Old English smæccan (to taste, smack). More at smake, smatch.

Noun[edit]

smack (plural smacks)

  1. A distinct flavor.
  2. A slight trace of something; a smattering.
  3. (slang) Heroin.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

smack (third-person singular simple present smacks, present participle smacking, simple past and past participle smacked)

  1. To indicate or suggest something.
    Her reckless behavior smacks of pride.
    • Shakespeare
      All sects, all ages, smack of this vice.
  2. To have a particular taste.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German smack (Low German Schmacke, Schmaake (small ship)) or Dutch smak.

Noun[edit]

smack (plural smacks)

  1. A small sailing vessel, commonly rigged as a sloop, used chiefly in the coasting and fishing trade and often called a fishing smack.

Etymology 3[edit]

From or akin to Dutch smakken (to fling down), Plautdietsch schmaksen (to smack the lips), regional German schmacken (compare Swedish smak (slap), Middle Low German smacken, the first part of Saterland Frisian smakmuulje (smack)).

Noun[edit]

smack (plural smacks)

  1. A sharp blow; a slap. See also: spank.
  2. A loud kiss.
    • Shakespeare
      a clamorous smack
  3. A quick, sharp noise, as of the lips when suddenly separated, or of a whip.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

smack (third-person singular simple present smacks, present participle smacking, simple past and past participle smacked)

  1. To slap someone, or to make a smacking sound.
    • Benjamin Disraeli
      A horse neighed, and a whip smacked, there was a whistle, and the sound of a cart wheel.
  2. (New Zealand) To strike a child (usually on the buttocks) as a form of discipline. (US spank)
  3. To wetly separate the lips, making a noise, after tasting something or in expectation of a treat.
    • 1763, Robert Lloyd, “A Familiar Epistle” in St. James Magazine:
      But when, obedient to the mode / Of panegyric, courtly ode / The bard bestrides, his annual hack, / In vain I taste, and sip and smack, / I find no flavour of the Sack.
  4. To kiss with a close compression of the lips, so as to make a sound when they separate.
Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

smack (comparative more smack, superlative most smack)

  1. As if with a smack or slap
    Right smack bang in the middle.
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

smack n

  1. (in the phrase "inte ett smack") smidgeon, piece, small bit

See also[edit]