smake

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English smaken (to smack, taste), partly from Old English smacian (to smack, pat, caress) and partly from Middle English smake, smac (smack, taste, flavour), from Old English smæc, smæcc (taste, flavour). Cognate with Scots smak (to taste, scent, smell). More at smack, smatch.

Verb[edit]

smake (third-person singular simple present smakes, present participle smaking, simple past and past participle smaked)

  1. (transitive) To smack; taste.
    • 1882, Bricktop, The trip of the Sardine Club:
      Even Bill Bitters could not find it in his heart to say a word against this moisture, and he actually smaked his lips, although he turned away lest someone should see him do it.
    • 1893, Margaret Sidney, Five little Peppers Midway:
      Now, that's good," smaking his lips in a pleased way.
    • 1918, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers (U.S.), Locomotive engineers journal:
      He smaked his lips in anticipation of the coming treat.
    • 2001, James Joyce, Dubliners:
      "And what about the address to the King?" said Mr. Lyons, after drinking and smaking his lips.

Noun[edit]

smake (plural smakes)

  1. A smack; taste; scent.
    • 1831, Congressional edition:
      The 15th we came to Hatorask, in thirty-six degrees and a terse, at four fadom, three leagues from the shore, where we might perceive a smake at the place where I left the colony, 1587."
    • 1856, Edward Augustus Bond, Giles Fletcher, Sir Jerome Horsey, Russia at the close of the sixteenth century:
      A smake there is in other things, but small purpose.

Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

smake

  1. singular present subjunctive of smaken

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle English smaken "to taste" from smak "a taste, flavor" from Old English smæc (taste, smack). More at smack

Noun[edit]

smake

  1. taste
  2. flavor

Derived terms[edit]