son

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See also: Son, són, søn, and sơn

Contents

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sone, from Old English sunu (son), from Proto-Germanic *sunuz (son), from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús (son), from Proto-Indo-European *seu̯H- (to bear, give birth). Cognate with Scots son (son), West Frisian soan (son), Eastern Frisian sone, suun (son), Dutch zoon (son), Afrikaans seun (son), Low German sone, son (son), German Sohn (son), Danish søn (son), Swedish son (son), Icelandic sonur (son), Lithuanian sūnùs (son), Russian сын (syn, son), Avestan [script needed] (hūnuš, son), Sanskrit सूनु (sūnú, son), Ancient Greek υἱύς (huiús), υἱός (huiós, son), Albanian çun (lad, boy, son), Armenian ուստր (ustr, son), Tocharian B soy, soṃśke (son).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

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son (plural sons)

  1. A male child, a boy or man in relation to his parents; one's male offspring.
    The Chinese and Indians say all too often: "I want a son, not a daughter."
  2. A male adopted person in relation to his adoption parents.
  3. A male person who has such a close relationship with an older or otherwise more authoritative person that he can be regarded as a son of the other person.
  4. A male person considered to have been significantly shaped by some external influence.
    He was a son of the mafia system.
  5. A male descendant.
    The pharaohs were believed to be sons of the Sun.
  6. A familiar address to a male person from an older or otherwise more authoritative person.
  7. (UK, colloquial) An informal address to a friend or person of equal authority.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Hypernyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sonus. Compare Daco-Romanian sun.

Noun[edit]

son n (plural sonuri)

  1. sound

Related terms[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Verb[edit]

son

  1. third-person plural present indicative of ser

Azeri[edit]

Other scripts
Cyrillic сон
Roman son
Perso-Arabic سون

Noun[edit]

son (definite accusative sonu, plural sonlar)

  1. end, ending

Declension[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Vulgar Latin sum, from Classical Latin suum.

Determiner[edit]

son

  1. Possessive of the third singular person for a singular male object; his, her.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin somnus.

Noun[edit]

son f (plural sons)

  1. sleep
Derived terms[edit]

Faroese[edit]

Noun[edit]

son

  1. indefinite accusative singular of sonur

Finnish[edit]

Contraction[edit]

son

  1. Contraction of se on "it is".

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin sonus.

Noun[edit]

son m (plural sons)

  1. Sound.
    Le son de ce piano est agréable.
    The sound of this piano is nice.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Vulgar Latin sum, from Classical Latin suum.

Determiner[edit]

son m (singular)

  1. (possessive) His, her, its (used to qualify masculine nouns).
    Elle a perdu son chapeau.
    She lost her hat.
    Il a perdu son chapeau.
    He lost his hat.
    J'aime son amie.
    I like her/his girlfriend.
Related terms[edit]
Possessee
Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine
Possessor Singular First person mon ma mes
Second person ton ta tes
Third person son sa ses
Plural First person notre nos
Second person votre vos
Third person leur leurs


Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin secundus. Cognate with Catalan segó.

Noun[edit]

son m (plural sons)

  1. bran
    Ceci est du pain de son.
    This bread is done with bran.

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

son m (plural sons)

  1. sound

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

son

  1. first-person singular present indicative of ser
  2. third-person plural present indicative of ser

German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /zoːn/, /zɔn/
  • Homophone: Sohn (according to one of the two pronunciations)

Pronoun[edit]

son

  1. (colloquial) Contraction of so ein.

External links[edit]

  • son in Duden online

Istriot[edit]

Verb[edit]

son

  1. first-person singular present indicative of ièsi
  2. second-person singular present indicative of ièsi
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 29:
      Ti son la manduleîna inzucherada.
      You are the sugared almond.

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

son

  1. rōmaji reading of そん

Ladin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

son

  1. first-person singular present indicative of ester

Etymology 2[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

son

  1. third-person singular present indicative of ester

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

son

  1. rafsi of sonci.

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

son m

  1. (archaic) swan (waterfowl of genus Cygnus)

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French son.

Noun[edit]

son m (plural sons)

  1. sound

Northern Sami[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

son

  1. he, she, it

Inflection[edit]

This pronoun needs an inflection-table template.


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sonr, from Proto-Germanic *sunuz, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

Noun[edit]

son m (definite singular sonen; indefinite plural søner; definite plural sønene)

  1. a son
    Han hadde to søner.
    He had two sons.

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

son m (feminine sa, plural ses)

  1. his/hers/its (third-person singular possessive)

Descendants[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English sunu (son), from Proto-Germanic *sunuz (son), from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús (son), from *seu̯H- (to bear, give birth).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

son (plural sons)

  1. son, male child

Derived terms[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Noun[edit]

son m (indeclinable)

  1. sake, account
    Dèan seo air ar son. - Do this for our sake.

Derived terms[edit]


Skolt Sami[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

son

  1. he, she, it (3rd person personal pronoun)

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sonus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

son m (plural sones)

  1. A pleasant sound, tone
  2. An Afro-Cuban musical form.
  3. A musical composition in this form.

Verb[edit]

son

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) present indicative form of ser.
  2. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present indicative form of ser.

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch zon, from Middle Dutch sonne (sun), from Old Dutch sunna, from Proto-Germanic *sunnǭ, from Proto-Indo-European *sh₂un-, *sóh₂wl̥.

Noun[edit]

son

  1. sun

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish son, sun, Old Norse sonr, from Proto-Germanic *sunuz, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús. Masculine in Late Modern Swedish.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

son c

  1. son; someone's male child
  2. definite singular of so

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic soŋ, from Proto-Turkic.

Adjective[edit]

son

  1. last, final

Antonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

son (definite accusative sonu, plural sonlar)

  1. end, ending
    Mutlu sonum - I am the happy ending (pronounciation on the first syllable: sonum)
    Mutlu sonum - My happy ending (pronounciation on the last syllable: sonum)

Declension[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Verb[edit]

son

  1. first-person singular present indicative of èser

Volapük[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

son (plural sons)

  1. son

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

Hypernyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]