sorites

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin sōrītēs, from the Ancient Greek σωρείτης (sōreítēs, fallacy of the heap), from σωρός (sōrós, heap).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sorites (plural sorites)

  1. (logic, rhetoric) A series of propositions whereby each conclusion is taken as the subject of the next.
    • 1760, Laurence Sterne, The Life & Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, Penguin 2003, p. 130:
      Why?—he would ask, making use of the sorites or syllogism of Zeno and Chrysippus without knowing it belonged to them.—Why? why are we a ruined people?—Because we are corrupted.——Whence is it, dear Sir, that we are corrupted?—Because we are needy [...] ——And wherefore, he would add,—are we needy?——From the neglect, he would answer

Derived terms[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek σωρείτης (sōreítēs, fallacy of the heap), from σωρός (sōrós, heap).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sōrītēs m (genitive sōrītae); first declension

  1. sorites; a logical sophism formed by an accumulation of arguments

Inflection[edit]

First declension, Greek type masculine in -ēs.

Number Singular Plural
nominative sōrītēs sōrītae
genitive sōrītae sōrītārum
dative sōrītae sōrītīs
accusative sōrītēn sōrītās
ablative sōrītē sōrītīs
vocative sōrītē sōrītae

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • sorites in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879