stå

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Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

stå

  1. standstill, halt

Usage notes[edit]

Only used in expressions:

Etymology[edit]

From Old Danish staa, possibly from an unattested eastern Old Norse stá, or via early Middle Low German stān. Both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *stāną.

Verb[edit]

stå (imperative stå, infinitive at stå, present tense står, past tense stod, past participle har stået)

  1. stand

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun use of the verb stå.

Noun[edit]

stå

  1. (only idiomatic, not inflected) stop up, stop short, break down
    Forhandlingene gikk i stå.
    The negotations broke down.
  2. (only in specific cases) a stand
    Store stå.
    A standing area for spectators at Bislett stadion in Oslo, literally: "the great stand"
  3. (slang, not inflected) erection, hard-on
Synonyms[edit]
stop up, stop short, break down
erection

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See Swedish stå.

Verb[edit]

  1. to stand.
    Bussen var så full at han måtte stå.
    The buss was so full he had to stand.
    Stå stille, sa jeg!
    I said, stand still!
  2. to be, be located.
    Det står en vase på bordet.
    There is a vase on the table.
  3. to stand still, be stopped
    Toget stod i ti minutter grunnet strømbrudd.
    The train was stopped for ten minutes due to a power outage.
  4. to take place, happen
    Når står bryllupet.
    When is the wedding.
    Slaget ved Waterloo stod i 1815.
    The battle of Warerloo took place in 1815.
  5. to reach, be at
    Vannspruten stod langt over brygga.
    The spurt of water reached way over the pier.
  6. to be written, to say
    Tror du ikke på meg? Det står i avisen.
    Don't you believe me? It says so in the paper.
  7. (tests and exams) to pass
    Hvordan gikk det, stod du til eksamen?
    How did it go, did you pass your exam. (literally: "how did it go, did you stand to the exam?")

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

to stand
to be located
to stand still, be stopped
to take place, happen
to reach, be at

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun use of the verb stå.

Noun[edit]

stå

  1. (only idiomatic, not inflected) stop up, stop short, break down
    Forhandlingane gjekk i stå.
    The negotations broke down.
  2. (only in specific cases) a stand
    Store stå.
    A standing area for spectators at Bislett stadion in Oslo, literally: "the great stand"
  3. (slang, not inflected) erection, hard-on
Synonyms[edit]
stop up, stop short, break down
erection

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See Swedish stå.

Verb[edit]

  • stå (present tense står; past tense stod/[sto]; past participle stått; present participle ståande; imperative stå)

or

  • [stande (present tense stend/stender; past tense stod/sto; past participle stade/stadi; present participle standande; imperative statt)]
  1. to stand.
    Bussen var så full at han måtte stå.
    The buss was so full he had to stand.
    Stå stille, sa eg!
    I said, stand still!
  2. to be, be located.
    Det står ei vase på bordet.
    There is a vase on the table.
  3. to stand still, be stopped
    Toget stod i ti minutt grunna straumbrot.
    The train was stopped for ten minutes due to a power outage.
  4. to take place, happen
    Når står bryllaupet.
    When is the wedding.
    Slaget ved Waterloo stod i 1815.
    The battle of Warerloo took place in 1815.
  5. to reach, be at
    Vannspruten stod langt over brygga.
    The spurt of water reached way over the pier.
  6. to be written, to say
    Trur du ikkje på meg? Det står i avisa.
    Don't you believe me? It says so in the paper.
  7. (tests and exams) to pass
    Korleis gjekk det, stod du til eksamen?
    How did it go, did you pass your exam. (literally: "how did it go, did you stand to the exam?")

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

to stand
to be located
to stand still, be stopped
to take place, happen
to reach, be at

Usage notes[edit]

Note the past tense form and alternative paradigm in brackets, the brackets indicate that these forms are optional for students only and are not allowed in official texts. These forms are either conservative (from or close to traditional Nynorsk) or radical (from or close to Bokmål) and are in Norwegian called klammeformer ("bracket forms") and originated from the idea to eventually fuse Bokmål and Nynorsk into one written language. This idea was officially abandoned in 2005, thus the system with such optional forms was abolished in Bokmål, but was kept in Nynorsk.

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish stā, possibly from an unattested eastern Old Norse stá, or via early Middle Low German stān. Both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *stāną.

Verb[edit]

stå

  1. stand; be in an upright position
    • 1904, Selma Lagerlöf, Herr Arnes penningar
      Då sir Archie gick förbi Elsalill, lade han sin hand på hennes för att få veta om det verkligen var en död, som stod där.
      When sir Archie passed Elsalill he put his hand on hers to make sure if it really was a dead one that was standing there.
    • 1930, Agnes von Krusenstjerna, Kvinnogatan
      En dag hade de stått över de ångande baljorna och gnott kläderna, heta i ansiktena av den varma och fuktiga luften.
      One day they had been standing over the steaming tubs scrubbing the clothes with their faces hot from the warm and humid air.
  2. (of machinery) be at a standstill, not be running
  3. (of events) be held, take place, happen
  4. be written down
    • 1912, August Strindberg, Ett halvt ark papper
      Där stod det, hela denna vackra historia, som avspeglats på den korta tiden av två år; allt han ville glömma stod där; ett stycke mänskoliv på ett halvt ark papper.
      "There it was written, this entire beautiful story that had taken place in just two short years; all he wanted to forget was written there; a piece of a human life on half a sheet of paper.

Conjugation[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • The verb stå is often used in constructions such as stå och <another verb>. These constructions impart some of the same sense that is commonly expressed in English through the use of a present participle, that is they show that it is an ongoing activity. The standing as such is a minor issue:
    • Vad står du och glor på? - What are you staring at?
    • Han bara står och mumlar. - He is just mumbling.
  • Note that the verbs sitta (to sit) and ligga (to lie down) may be used in a similar manner if the activity is taking place sitting or lying down.
  • The past participle (stånden) is virtually obsolete: only occasional contemporary use.
  • In speech it is pretty common to use stog as past tense. However, it is is pretty uniformly considered an error due to a mix up with the verb slå, where the past tense indeed is slog.

Derived terms[edit]