sward

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English sweard (skin, rind) [1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sward (plural swards)

  1. (uncountable) A layer of earth into which grass has grown; turf; sod.
    • Tennyson
      The sward was trim as any garden lawn.
  2. (countable) An expanse of land covered in grass; a lawn or meadow.
    • 1890: Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company [1]
      ...the trees began to thin and the sward to spread out onto a broad, green lawn, where five cows lay in the sunshine...
    • 1918: Booth Tarkington, The Magnificent Ambersons [2]
      Only where George stood was there left a sward as of yore; the great, level, green lawn that served for both the Major's house and his daughter's.
  3. (obsolete, UK, dialect) skin; covering
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

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References[edit]

  1. ^ A glossary: or, Collection of words, phrases, names, and allusions ..., Volume 2 by Robert Nares,James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps,Thomas Wright (London, 1888), p. 855