sycomore

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Circa 1350, from Old French sicamor, from Latin sycomorus, from Ancient Greek συκόμορος (sukómoros, fig-mulberry), from σῦκον (sûkon, fig) + μόρον (móron, mulberry). Possibly influenced by Hebrew שִׁקְמָה (shikmá, sycomore fig), or even modified from it through folk etymology.

Noun[edit]

sycomore (plural sycomores)

  1. A type of fig, Ficus sycomorus, native to the Middle East; the sycamore tree of the Bible.

Usage notes[edit]

Sycomore is an obsolete spelling of sycamore that hearkens closer to the word's Greek roots. Some writers have used the more Hellenic sycomore when referring to the Biblical tree to distinguish it from other trees now called sycamore.

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

sycomore

  1. vocative singular of sycomorus