tardigrade

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɑɹdɪˌgɹeɪd/

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin tardigradus (slowly stepping), from tardus (slow) + gradior (step, walk)

Adjective[edit]

tardigrade (comparative more tardigrade, superlative most tardigrade)

  1. Sluggish; moving slowly.
    • 1850, Joses Badcock, “Botany; or, Phytology”, in Poems, volume 1, page 67:
      Each tendril ending in a perfect claw, / Obeys the whole routine of Nature's law; / Transforms each sinus to a sylvan shade, / Though p'rhaps its force is rather tardigrade.
    • 1863, George Eliot, Romola:
      He ran on into the piazza, but he quickly heard the tramp of feet behind him, for the other two prisoners had been released, and the soldiers were struggling and fighting their way after them, in such tardigrade fashion as their hoof-shaped shoes would allow—impeded, but not very resolutely attacked, by the people.
    • 2001, Richard S. Conde, “The Metronome”, in Century One, ISBN 0-595-16296-7, page 92:
      In sorrow, its voice is tardigrade but loud, dragging time at a snail's pace before our eyes.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

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Wikipedia

From New Latin Tardigrada (a phylum of microscopic animals).

Noun[edit]

tardigrade (plural tardigrades)

  1. (zoology) A member of the animal phylum Tardigrada.
Synonyms[edit]
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Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tardigrade f

  1. feminine plural of tardigrado