tect

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See also: téct

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the Middle English tecte, from the Latin tēctus (covered), the perfect passive participle of tegō (I cover).

Adjective[edit]

tect (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete, rare, construed as a past participle) Covered; hidden.
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • † Tect, ppl. a.” listed on page 137 of volume IX, part II (Su–Th), § ii (T) of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles [1st ed., 1919]
      † Tect, ppl. a.Obs. rare. [ad. L. tect-us, pa. pple. of tegĕre to cover.] Covered, hidden. (Const. as pa. pple. See also Tectly.) So † Te·cted. [¶] c 1440 Pallad. on Husb. vi. 180 With chaf or fern this boordis do be tecte. Ibid. viii. 79 The tuppe is chosun fair of altitude, Ywombed side, and tecte in whitest wolle. c 1557 Abp. Parker Ps. cxv. 332 Why els no doubt, the Heathen sect, Would say where is their God so tect? 1657 Tomlinson Renou’s Disp. 459 The shells wherewith they are tected.
  • †tect, ppl. a.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd ed., 1989]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the Latin tēctum (roof), neuter substantive of tēctus (covered); see above.

Noun[edit]

tect (plural tects)

  1. (obsolete, rare) A roof.

References[edit]

  • † Tect, sb.” listed on page 137 of volume IX, part II (Su–Th), § ii (T) of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles [1st ed., 1919]
      † Tect, sb.Obs. rare — 1. [ad. L. tect-um roof, prop. neut. of tectus, pa. pple. ‘covered’: see next.] A roof. In comb. te·ct-demo·lished a., having the roof demolished, disroofed. [¶] 1632Lithgow Trav. x. 432 Tect-demolished Churches, vnpassable Bridges.
  • †tect, n.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd ed., 1989]