thirl

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English thirl, thiril, from Old English þyrel (a hole made through anything, opening, aperture, orifice, perforation), from Proto-Germanic *þurhilą (hole, opening), from Proto-Indo-European *tr̥h₂kʷelo- which is *tr̥h₂kʷe + *-lo (equivalent to through +‎ -le) from *terh₂-. Related to thrill, drill.

Noun[edit]

thirl (plural thirls)

  1. (archaic or dialectal) A hole, aperture, especially a nostril.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English thirlen, thurlen, thorlen, from Old English þyrlian, þyrelian (to make a hole through, pierce through, perforate; make hollow, excavate; make vain), from the noun (see above).

Verb[edit]

thirl (third-person singular simple present thirls, present participle thirling, simple past and past participle thirled)

  1. To pierce, perforate, penetrate.
  2. (obsolete) To drill or bore.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Origin uncertain. Perhaps a blend of throw and hurl.

Verb[edit]

thirl (third-person singular simple present thirls, present participle thirling, simple past and past participle thirled)

  1. (obsolete) To throw (a projectile).
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.8:
      And many Authours doe in this manner wound the protection of their cause, by over-rashly running against that which they take hold-of, thirling [transl. lanceant] such darts at their enemies, that might with much more advantage be cast at them.