tio

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See also: tio-, tío, and tió

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish tío.

Noun[edit]

tio m (plural tios)

  1. uncle
  2. (colloquial) dude; pal, when addressing them.

See also[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Esperanto ti- (demonstrative correlative prefix) + -o (correlative suffix of objects)

Pronoun[edit]

tio (plural tioj, accusative singular tion, accusative plural tiojn)

  1. that [thing] (demonstrative correlative of objects)

Usage notes[edit]

As with other correlatives of objects, and unlike English that, tio always functions as a noun, never an adjective.

When combined with ĉi, the adverbial particle of proximity, ĉi tio or tio ĉi means "this [thing]".

See also[edit]


Gallo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin clausus (compare French clos), perfect passive participle of claudō, claudere (shut, close).

Noun[edit]

tio m (plural tios)

  1. (agriculture) enclosure, field

Maori[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian (compare Hawaiian kio, Indonesian tiram).

Noun[edit]

tio

  1. oyster

Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse tíu.

Numeral[edit]

tīo

  1. ten

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese tio, tyo, from Late Latin thius, from Ancient Greek θεῖος (theîos). Compare Spanish tío, Italian zio, Sardinian tiu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tio m (plural tios, feminine tia, feminine plural tias)

  1. uncle (brother of someone's father or mother, or an aunt's husband)

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse tíu, from Proto-Germanic *tehun (ten), from Proto-Indo-European *déḱm̥t (ten). Cognate with Icelandic tíu, Faroese tíggju, Norwegian ti, Danish ti and English ten.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtiːˌʊ/, /ˈtiːˌɛ/
  • (file)

Numeral[edit]

tio

  1. (cardinal) ten

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]