toom

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English toom, tom, from Old English tōm (empty), from Proto-Germanic *tōmaz (free, available, empty), from Proto-Indo-European *doma- (to tame), *dema- (to build). Cognate with Danish and Swedish tom (empty, vacant), Icelandic tómur (empty).

Adjective[edit]

toom (comparative more toom, superlative most toom)

  1. (rare or dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Empty.
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

toom (plural tooms)

  1. (chiefly Scottish) A piece of waste ground where rubbish is shot.

Verb[edit]

toom (third-person singular simple present tooms, present participle tooming, simple past and past participle toomed)

  1. (rare or dialectal) To empty.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English toom, tome, tom, from Old Norse tóm (vacant time, leisure), from Proto-Germanic *tōmą (vacant time, leisure). Related to Old Norse tōmr (vacant, empty).

Noun[edit]

toom (usually uncountable, plural tooms)

  1. Vacant time, leisure.

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *tōm, from Proto-Germanic *taumaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

toom m (plural tomen, diminutive toompje n)

  1. bridle, rein
    Je moet die jongens echt even in toom houden - You really need to keep those boys in check
  2. a flock of birds (especially ducks, geese and swans)
  3. frenulum

Anagrams[edit]