tor-

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Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse tor- (hard, difficult, wrong, bad, prefix), from Proto-Germanic *tuz- (hard, difficult, wrong, bad), from Proto-Indo-European *dus- (bad, ill, difficult), from Proto-Indo-European *dēwǝ- (to fail, be behind, be lacking); Cognate with Icelandic tor- (prefix).

Prefix[edit]

tor-

  1. with difficulty or hardship; difficult, hard

Derived terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse tor- (hard, difficult, wrong, bad, prefix), from Proto-Germanic *tuz- (hard, difficult, wrong, bad), from Proto-Indo-European *dus- (bad, ill, difficult), from Proto-Indo-European *dēwǝ- (to fail, be behind, be lacking).

Cognate with Faroese tor- (prefix), Nynorsk tor- (prefix) and Swedish dialect tor- (prefix),[1] Old English tor- (prefix) and (prefix)[1] (whence Middle English tor, tore (prefix), toor (prefix), whence English tore (hard, difficult, wearisome, tedious; strong, sturdy, great, massive; full, rich) and torfer), Old High German zur- (mis-, prefix),[1] and Gothic 𐍄𐌿𐌶- (tuz-, hard, difficult, prefix).[1]

Confer Ancient Greek δυσ- (dys-, bad, ill, difficult, prefix)[1] and the English dys- (prefix).

Alternative forms[edit]

Prefix[edit]

tor-

  1. with difficulty or hardship; difficult, hard

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Ásgeir Blöndal Magnússon. Page 785 of the Íslensk orðsifjabók (Book of Icelandic Etymology). Publisher: Stofnun Árna Magnússonar á Íslandi (Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies), first print 1989 (ISBN 978-9979-654-01-8)