trance

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Trance

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English traunce, from Old French transe (fear of coming evil", "passage from life to death), from transir (to be numb with fear", "die", "pass on), from Latin trānseō (to cross over)

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance (plural trances)

  1. A dazed or unconscious condition.
  2. (consciousness) A state of concentration, awareness and/or focus that filters information and experience; e.g. meditation, possession, etc.
    • Bible, Acts x. 10
      And he became very hungry, and would have eaten; but while they made ready, he fell into a trance.
    • Spenser
      My soul was ravished quite as in a trance.
  3. (psychology) A state of low response to stimulus and diminished, narrow attention.
  4. (psychology) The previous state induced by hypnosis.
  5. (uncountable) Trance music, a genre of electronic dance music.
  6. (obsolete) A tedious journey.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

trance (third-person singular simple present trances, present participle trancing, simple past and past participle tranced)

  1. To entrance.
    • Shakespeare
      And there I left him tranced.
  2. (obsolete) To pass over or across; to traverse.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      Trance the world over.
    • Tennyson
      When thickest dark did trance the sky.
  3. (obsolete) To pass; to travel.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English trance

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance f (uncountable)

  1. trance (music genre)

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English trance

Noun[edit]

trance f (invariable)

  1. trance (music genre)

Anagrams[edit]


Polish[edit]

Quote-alpha.png This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

Etymology[edit]

English trance

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance m

  1. trance (music genre)
Declension[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English trance.

Noun[edit]

trance m (uncountable)

  1. (music) trance (a genre of electronic dance music)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

trance

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of trançar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of trançar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of trançar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of trançar

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

trance m (plural trances)

  1. Obsolete form of transe.