troppo

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From tropical +‎ -o (diminutive suffix). First used by Australian troops in tropical regions during WWII, in the sense “affected by war service in the tropics.” [1][2]

Adjective[edit]

troppo (not comparable)

  1. (Australia, slang, with "go") Crazy, mad, strangely behaving; especially as attributed to hot weather.
    Barry′s gone troppo and married that sheila he′s only known for two weeks.
    After three months by himself on his ‘dream’ tropical island he went troppo and smashed all the equipment.
    • 1989, Rosie Boycott, All for Love, page 163,
      [] She calls these rehearsals my singing lessons - but at least I don′t have people rushing in thinking I′ve gone troppo . . .’
      ‘Except me.’ Violet′s smile lingered as she gazed at him.
    • 2009, Paul Tapp, Disquiet - the Justifiable Homicide of an Australian Vietnam Veteran, page 121,
      For a lone Digger gone troppo, as Joe is deemed to have done, it is a realistic scenario.

Usage notes[edit]

Used in the verb go troppo — to go crazy, to act strangely, as due to tropical heat.

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1978, G.A.Wilkes, A Dictionary of Australian Colloquialisms, Fontana.
  2. ^ Australian National Dictionary Centre Home » Australian words » Meanings and origins of Australian words and idioms » T

Interlingua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Italian, and also from French trop.

Adverb[edit]

troppo (not comparable)

  1. too much

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Germanic, cognate with French trop (too much).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtrɔppo/, [ˈt̪rɔp.po]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: tròp‧po

Adjective[edit]

troppo m (feminine troppa, masculine plural troppi, feminine plural troppe)

  1. too much, too many

Pronoun[edit]

troppo

  1. too much, too many

Adverb[edit]

troppo

  1. too much, too long
    allegro ma non troppo[1]
    cheerful but not too much