tush

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English tusc

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tush (plural tushes)

  1. (now dialectal) A tusk.
    • 1818, John Keats, "To J. H. Reynolds, Esq.":
      Perhaps one or two whose lives have patient wings, / And through whose curtains peeps no hellish nose, / No wild-boar tushes, and no mermaid's toes [...].
    • 1945, George Orwell, Animal Farm, chapter 1
      [] he was still a majestic-looking pig, with a wise and benevolent appearance in spite of the fact that his tushes had never been cut.
  2. A small tusk sometimes found on the female Indian elephant.

Etymology 2[edit]

Short for toches, from Yiddish תחת (tokhes), from Hebrew תַּחַת (bottom). Since 1914.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tush (plural tushes)

  1. (US, colloquial) The buttocks
  2. (UK, colloquial) nonsense; tosh
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

A "natural utterance" (OED), attested since the 15th century

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

tush

  1. an exclamation of contempt or rebuke
    • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond Chapter 1
      He glanced through the letter and shook his head. "Tush! tush! And the wife of the bank manager too—the bank manager of Pudlington, James! Can you conceive of anything so dreadful? But I'm afraid Mrs. Bank Manager is a puss—a distinct puss. It's when they get on the soul-mate stunt that the furniture begins to fly."

Etymology 4[edit]

of unknown origin, attested since 1841.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tush (third-person singular simple present tushes, present participle tushing, simple past and past participle tushed)

  1. (transitive) To pull or drag (a heavy object such as a tree or log).

Anagrams[edit]


Uzbek[edit]

Noun[edit]

tush (plural tushlar)

  1. dream