verge

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See also: vergé

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French verge (rod or wand of office), hence "scope, territory dominated", from Latin virga (shoot, rod stick), of unknown origin. Earliest attested sense in English is now-obsolete meaning "male member, penis" (c.1400). Modern sense is from the notion of 'within the verge' (1509, also as Anglo-Norman dedeinz la verge), i.e. "subject to the Lord High Steward's authority" (as symbolized by the rod of office), originally a 12-mile radius round the royal court, which sense shifted to "the outermost edge of an expanse or area."

Noun[edit]

verge (plural verges)

  1. A rod or staff of office, e.g. of a verger.
    1. (UK, historical) The stick or wand with which persons were formerly admitted tenants, by holding it in the hand and swearing fealty to the lord. Such tenants were called tenants by the verge.
  2. An edge or border.
    • John Milton (1608-1674)
      Even though we go to the extreme verge of possibility to invent a supposition favourable to it, the theory [] implies an absurdity.
    • Matthew Arnold (1822-1888)
      But on the horizon's verge descried, / Hangs, touched with light, one snowy sail.
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, chapter 1, The Amateur Poacher:
      As one sat on the sward behind the elm, with the back turned on the rick and nothing in front but the tall elms and the oaks in the other hedge, it was quite easy to fancy it the verge of the prairie with the backwoods close by.
    1. (UK, Australia, New Zealand) The grassy area between the sidewalk and the street; a tree lawn.
    2. (figuratively) An extreme limit beyond which something specific will happen.
      I was on the verge of tears.
  3. (obsolete) The phallus.
    1. (zoology) The external male organ of certain mollusks, worms, etc.
  4. An old measure of land: a virgate or yardland.
  5. A circumference; a circle; a ring.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      The inclusive verge / Of golden metal that must round my brow.
  6. (architecture) The shaft of a column, or a small ornamental shaft.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Oxf. Gloss. to this entry?)
  7. (architecture) The edge of the tiling projecting over the gable of a roof.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Encyc. Brit to this entry?)
  8. (horology) The spindle of a watch balance, especially one with pallets, as in the old vertical escapement.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (strip of land between street and sidewalk): see list at tree lawn
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin vergō (to bend, turn, tend toward, incline), from Proto-Indo-European *werg- (to turn), from a root Proto-Indo-European *wer- (to turn, bend) (compare versus); strongly influenced by the above noun.

Verb[edit]

verge (third-person singular simple present verges, present participle verging, simple past and past participle verged)

  1. (intransitive) To be or come very close; to border; to approach.
    Eating blowfish verges on insanity.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • verge” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

verge

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of vergen

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French verge (rod or wand of office), hence "scope, territory dominated", from Latin virga (shoot, rod stick), of unknown origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

verge f (plural verges)

  1. A rod
  2. A male member, penis

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin root *virdia, from Latin viridia. Compare Italian verza, Portuguese verça, Spanish berza, Romanian varză.

Noun[edit]

verge f (plural vergis)

  1. cabbage

Related terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

verge

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of vergō

Middle French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Latin virga.

Noun[edit]

verge f (plural verges)

  1. rod; stick; staff
    • Exodus, the Bible
      Moyse ietta en la terre la verge qu'il tenoit dans sa main [] elle fust soudain changé en serpent
      Moses throw on the ground the staff that he held in is hand [] suddenly, it changes into a serpent

Etymology 2[edit]

Latin virgō.

Noun[edit]

verge f (plural verges)

  1. female virgin (female person who has never had sexual intercourse)