viaticum

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English[edit]

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 Viaticum on Wikipedia

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Etymology[edit]

From Latin viāticum (travelling-money, provisions for a journey), from viāticus (of a road or journey), from via (road).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

viaticum (plural viatica)

  1. The Eucharist, when given to a person who is dying or one in danger of death.
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, p. 37:
      from Anglo-Saxon times there had been a deep conviction that to receive the viaticum was a virtual death sentence which would make subsequent recovery impossible.
  2. Provisions, money, or other supplies given to someone setting off on a long journey (often figurative).
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 20:
      Towards night-fall he entered a town called Sa’adiyah where he alighted and took out somewhat of his viaticum and ate
    • 1971, Anthony Burgess, M/F, Penguin 2004, p. 184:
      That viaticum I had been made to drink had undoubtedly been spiked with cantharides or something

Translations[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From viāticus (of a road or journey), from via (road).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

viāticum n (genitive viāticī); second declension

  1. travelling-money; provision for a journey
  2. (figuratively) a journey
  3. resources; means
  4. money made abroad, especially as a soldier, or used to travel abroad

Inflection[edit]

Second declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative viāticum viātica
genitive viāticī viāticōrum
dative viāticō viāticīs
accusative viāticum viātica
ablative viāticō viāticīs
vocative viāticum viātica

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • viaticum in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879