wagen

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See also: Wagen, wägen, and Wägen

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch wagen, from Old Dutch wagan, from Proto-Germanic *wagnaz, from Proto-Indo-European *woǵʰnos, from *weǵʰ-. Cognate with English wain (and wagon, itself borrowed from Dutch), German Wagen, West Frisian wein, Danish vogn, Swedish vagn.

Noun[edit]

wagen m (plural wagens, diminutive wagentje n)

  1. wagon, carriage
  2. (mainly the diminutive) cart
  3. automobile, car, van
  4. sled, moving platform on wheels or rails a heavy machine etc. is mounted on
  5. (metonymically) A load filling one of the above vehicles
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch waghen. Cognate with German wagen.

Verb[edit]

wagen (past singular waagde, past participle gewaagd)

  1. (intransitive) To venture, take risks
  2. To dare, presume
  3. To risk, to jeopardize
Conjugation[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

wagen

  1. Plural form of waag

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle Dutch wagen, from Old Dutch *wagon, from Proto-Germanic *wagōną.

Verb[edit]

wagen (past singular waagde, past participle gewaagd)

  1. (transitive) To move
  2. (intransitive) To be moved, literally or figuratively in many senses
Conjugation[edit]
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Related terms[edit]

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

wagen (third-person singular simple present wagt, past tense wagte, past participle gewagt, auxiliary haben)

  1. To venture, dare
  2. To risk, jeopardize

Conjugation[edit]

External links[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch *wagan, from Proto-Germanic *wagnaz.

Noun[edit]

wagen m

  1. wagon, cart
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch *wagon, from Proto-Germanic *wagōną.

Verb[edit]

wagen

  1. to venture
Conjugation[edit]
Descendants[edit]